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Following is one of the main operations in my java code:

 AtomicDoubleArray array1 = new AtomicDoubleArray(25);

 for(int i =0 ; i< array1.size(); i++){
     double a = array1.get(i)*0.001;
     double b = a+ array1.get(i);
     array1.set(b);
 }

Is the above code is thread safe? If not i can I make above code thread safe?I would like not to keep locking while reading elements but locking during setting the value of each of the components.It means a number of threads can set the different componets of array1.

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1  
That doesn't compile –  SLaks Aug 5 '12 at 12:45
    
What's "Atomic DoubleArray array1 = new Atomic DoubleArray(25);"? How can we say if this class (probably your own) is thread safe? –  Thomas Uhrig Aug 5 '12 at 12:51
    
it's a guava class: AtomicDoubleArray –  Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 5 '12 at 12:52
    
You have to specify thread-safe w/ regard to what. The get operations are always safe if there is no concurrent modification for most datastructures (i.e. such that don't alter their internal state - like order access'd LinkedHashMap) –  bestsss Aug 5 '12 at 15:26
    
A saner idiom would probably be to do only one get (into a shared variable) and to do a CAS rather than an unconditional set. –  Louis Wasserman Aug 5 '12 at 18:51

2 Answers 2

Is the above code is thread safe?

That depends on what you mean with thread safety. Each individual get() and set() operation should be thread safe, but multiple threads could be calling this method concurrently, so the individual array entries could be reassigned by a second thread before the first thread completes the iteration. There's nothing you can do about that except synchronizing on a common Object (which could either be the array or some other dedicated lock Object)

I would like not to keep locking while reading elements but locking during setting the value of each of the components.It means a number of threads can set the different componets of array1.

If I understand this right, you can use your code as-is without additional locking (see above), except for this part:

 array1.set(b);

which needs to read:

 array1.set(i, b);
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multiple threads could be calling this method concurrently, so the individual array entries could be reassigned by a second thread before the first thread completes the iteration. this is not problem for me. the only problem is, when sum thread is reading the value, that might be getting modified by another thread and the value may not be seen to the thread which is reading the value and it is ultimately returning NaN –  thetna Aug 5 '12 at 15:46

You may get different values on the two consecutive calls to to array1.get(i). If you want to avoid synchronisation, have a look at copy on write data structures (e.g. CopyOnWriteArrayList - http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/CopyOnWriteArrayList.html)

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it does not matter if i get two different values in the consecutive calls. but it is returning null, which is ultimately resulting into NaN –  thetna Aug 5 '12 at 15:42
1  
Are you saying that array1.get(i) returns null as a side effect of a another thread concurrently modifying array1? –  David Soroko Aug 7 '12 at 12:16
    
yes, that is my whole point :) –  thetna Aug 7 '12 at 15:31
    
AtomicDoubleArray.get() can't retun a null, only doubles and runtime exceptions. Most likely you put something into array1 that can't be represented as double like 0/0. –  David Soroko Aug 7 '12 at 18:57

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