Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If you have two classes Boo and Foo, and each Instance of Foo contains in it an instance of Boo, can you have a Setter for a private attribute in Boo contained inside in the constructor of Foo?

share|improve this question
    
As a matter of fact, generally it is better to call the getters/setters instead of setting the variables directly. –  Rosdi Kasim Aug 5 '12 at 13:04
1  
On your revised Student class you should be invoking this.name.setFirstName() not Name.setFirstName() the former is attempting to invoke a method (setter) on a particular object, whereas the latter is attempting to invoke a static method on the Name class. –  Charlie Aug 5 '12 at 13:20
    
In the Name class should I remove the parameters from the Constructor as the next step? The class compiles when I do this but I'm not sure I fully understand the logic behind how the Name class works anymore. Now when a Name object is initiated from within the Student class the constructor will run but there are no parameters for it to set firstName and lastName with so I don't understand how the construtor runs without an error? –  user1577173 Aug 5 '12 at 14:06
    
Normally fields are set to their default values. As String is an object and not a primitive type (although a special one) the field values would be set to null. This is probably not for the best as a null value would indicate that the object is in an illegal state - that is, if any Name instance must contain both a first name and a last name. If this is the case, leave the constructor as it is. –  Maarten Bodewes Aug 5 '12 at 21:21
    
What you should not do is call getters or setters of the this instance from the constructor; if they are overridden you may get strange behaviour (Effective Java 2nd edition, item #17). It's perfectly fine to call getters/setters of other instances, it's even recommended. –  Maarten Bodewes Aug 5 '12 at 21:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, absolutely. Why would you not be able to?

class Boo {
    private String name;

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

class Foo {
    private final Boo boo;

    public Foo() {
        boo = new Boo();
        boo.setName("boo");
    }
}

The fact that you ask the question suggests there's something you think might go wrong - what in particular did you have in mind?

share|improve this answer
    
I had been advised not to do it, but I don't see a problem in doing it. I'm new to coding so I just wanted to be sure. Thanks. –  user1577173 Aug 5 '12 at 13:00
    
@user1577173 You better listen to God. –  Rosdi Kasim Aug 5 '12 at 13:02
    
@user1577173: When someone suggests that you don't do something, you should ask them for reasons why. It's possible that what you were advised wasn't really what you've represented here - but in any case, if you understand the reasons behind advice, it makes it a lot easier to apply it more widely. –  Jon Skeet Aug 5 '12 at 13:02
    
Ah, huh, sorry. Did not expect that as I didn't see a question in there. Removing my comments, you may want to do same. –  Maarten Bodewes Aug 5 '12 at 21:16

A better answer is to try it out yourself.

It is not hard to test and see the results in this case.

How else can your learn how to program if not by doing it?

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. I've posted revised code in the original comment. I think I'm going in the right direction but I havn't been able to get it to compile again yet. –  user1577173 Aug 5 '12 at 13:17

Yes, you can. I can't see any problem about it.

EDIT:

Uncomment your code. Your getter/setters are just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my code and uncommented the setters and I'm trying to edit my code to allow me to use them properly but the code is no longer compiling. I've edited my initial comment to include the revised code. Do I need to edit the parameters in the Name constructor if I'm using a setter? –  user1577173 Aug 5 '12 at 13:14
    
which error do you get? –  Heisenbug Aug 5 '12 at 13:15

The problem I see in your new code is here:

    this.name = new Name();
    Name.setFirstName(firstName);
    Name.setLastName(lastName);

Name is a class name. In order for Name.setFirstName() to be a valid call, setFirstName() would have to be a static method in Name. Presumably it is an instance method instead. You need to invoke it for a specific instance of the class, in this case the one referred to by this.name. So the correct code would be:

    this.name = new Name();
    this.name.setFirstName(firstName);
    this.name.setLastName(lastName);

Back to your original question -- my guess is that the advice you were given not to call setters from your constructor was based on an idea along the lines of "constructors should not have side effects". In this case, you are constructing a brand new Name object to be a part of your new Student, so it is perfectly appropriate to make any calls you need to initialize the object.

However, I don't see why you would prefer this to calling Name's constructor. Fewer lines, and the whole thing either succeeds or doesn't.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. that makes sense. In the Name class should I remove the parameters from the Constructor as the next step? The class compiles when I do this but I'm not sure I fully understand the logic behind how the Name class works anymore. Now when a Name object is initiated from within the Student class the constructor will run but there are no parameters for it to set firstName and lastName with so I don't understand how the construtor runs without an error? –  user1577173 Aug 5 '12 at 13:38
    
Again, I don't understand why you would prefer (A) calling a no-argument constructor then the setters, over (B) calling a two-argument constructor that sets the members. Generally, you want the constructor do do everything that makes an instance of the class useful. What use is a Name object without values for the firstName and lastName members? –  Dave Costa Aug 5 '12 at 15:53
    
When you invoke Name(), it is not calling the two-argument constructor that you wrote in your code. Every class has a default no-argument constructor that does nothing. In this case, I would suggest that a Name with no values is a useless construct, so you should not use that constructor. You can even prevent it from being used by explicitly declaring it private. –  Dave Costa Aug 5 '12 at 15:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.