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I tested the same set of code in both Languages.

With C++:

    int main()
{
    vector<double> x(1000000);
    char stop = 0;
    cin >> stop;
    printPassByReference(x);
    return 0;
}

void printPassByReference(vector<double> &x){
    const int size = x.size();
    for(int i=0;i<size;++i){
        cout << x[i] << endl;
    }
}

And with C#:

        static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<Double> x = new List<Double>();
        foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(1, 1000000))
        {
            x.Add(i);
        }
        string stop = "0";
        stop = Console.ReadLine();
        printPassByValue(x);
        stop = Console.ReadLine();
    }



    static void printPassByValue(List<Double> x){
        for (int i = 0; i < x.Count; ++i)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", x[i]);
        }
    }

C++: 1 Minute and 4 Seconds, 8.200K Memory, AVG 3,7% CPU while printing. C#: 32 Seconds, 23.916K Memory, AVG 2,8% CPU while printing.

Why is C# twice as fast? I thought C++ would be faster because it is machine code and not just bytecode like C#.


Now i'm (hopefully) bench the vector and list, not the math :) C++

    int main()
{
    vector<double> x(1000000);
    printPassByReference(x);
    int t = clock();
    cout << ((float)t)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    char stop = 0;
    cin >> stop;
    return 0;
}

void printPassByReference(vector<double> &x){
    for(int i=0;i<x.size();++i){
        x[i] += 0.5;
        x[i] -= 0.25;
    }
}

C#

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Double> x = new List<Double>();
            foreach (int i in Enumerable.Range(1, 1000000))
            {
                x.Add(i);
            }
            Stopwatch timer = new Stopwatch();
            timer.Start();
            printPassByValue(x);
            timer.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", timer.Elapsed);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }



        static void printPassByValue(List<Double> x){
            for (int i = 0; i < x.Count; ++i)
            {
                //some operations
                x[i] += 0.5;
                x[i] -= 0.25;
            }
        }

C++: 12ms C#: 21ms

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closed as not constructive by Henk Holterman, Kev Aug 5 '12 at 13:46

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
are you sure you are not compiling it in debug mode rather than release? –  Heisenbug Aug 5 '12 at 13:11
4  
Or maybe Console is fater that std::cout? By the way, what optimization options did you apply? –  Igor R. Aug 5 '12 at 13:11
5  
This is measuring I/O, not List<> or vector<>. –  Henk Holterman Aug 5 '12 at 13:13
1  
While the C# program is compiled into bytecode, the interpreter actually converts the bytecode into native code which is then executed normally direct by the CPU. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 5 '12 at 13:17
2  
Not surprising -- almost anything is faster than std::cout (and iostreams in general) –  Ben Voigt Aug 5 '12 at 13:21

2 Answers 2

You are not testing C#. What you are testing here is the console print function. It dominates the running time. You can see that from the fact that the CPU is mostly idle.

If you intend to measure how long printing takes, this is a valid benchmark. If you intend to measure something else (likely), this benchmark does not tell you anything.

You cannot measure how fast a particular language is. You can only measure the combination of language and workload. You are applying an uninteresting workload here.

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Try running it without cout and rather just edit each value by adding one, this should test both the read and write speed for both.

If you need a more accurate time, try using Environment.TickCount before the processing and after then subtract the end from the start to get the ms it took.

int start = Environment.TickCount();
// do stuff here for processing
int end = Environment.TickCount();
int time = end - start;
Console.WriteLine(time);
share|improve this answer
    
Done so far, C# requires 21ms. But im still searching for a method in c++. :D –  slopsucker Aug 5 '12 at 13:25
    
Change your printpassbyreference to this: void printPassByReference(vector<double> &x){ int timestart = Environment::TickCount(); const int size = x.size(); for(int i=0;i<size;++i){ x[i] = x[i] + 1; } int timeend = Environment::TickCount(); cout << "Time Taken: " << timeend - timestart << "ms"; } –  Annie the Eagle Aug 5 '12 at 13:28
    
Ok, C++ takes 12ms. I post my actual algo –  slopsucker Aug 5 '12 at 13:30

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