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What is the difference between object keys with quotes and without quotes?

I mostly know JavaScript from using it, but there's something I don't understand yet.

What's the difference between these two object literals:

var obj1 = {
   myProp: '123'
};

var obj2 = {
   'myProp': '123'
};

Are they just 'synonyms', or is there a subtle difference?

Thanks!

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marked as duplicate by Michael Berkowski, Tadeck, minitech, nnnnnn, rekire Aug 5 '12 at 14:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
@EsTeGe: Have you searched for the answer? As Bismark already mentioned, this question has been answered before. -1 –  Tadeck Aug 5 '12 at 13:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the object initializer syntax, keys can be numeric literals, identifiers, or strings.

var obj1 = {
    1e9: "123" //valid because it's a numeric literal
}

var obj2 = {
    $_ASd: "123" //Valid because it's a valid identifier I.E. you could make a variable called $_Asd
}

var obj3 = {
    $ hello world: "123" //invalid because it's not an identifier, I.E. you could not make a variable called $ hello world
}

var obj4 = {
    '$ hello world': "123" //valid because it's a valid string
}

After that the key is turned into a string regardless of what it was in the syntax, so in the case of 1e9 the key will be a string "1000000000".

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Nothing when there isn't an operator inside of it.

var obj1 = {
   my+Prop: '123' // illegal
};

var obj2 = {
   'my+Prop': '123' // legal
};
share|improve this answer
    
Or a space..... –  Michael Berkowski Aug 5 '12 at 13:54
    
Or a number at the start. The correct way to say it would be "when it's not a valid identifier". –  minitech Aug 5 '12 at 13:56

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