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Given an OrderedCollection like this:

noise1
noise2
noise3
signal1
signal1
signal1
signal1
randomButInteresting
noise4
noise5

i want to select to a new OrderedCollection all the objects "signal1" and the object that comes after this series of "signal1"s, "randomButInteresting". (a series of one and the same signal occurs only once per Collection.)

What is the most elegant way to do this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using Lukas' version with PetitParser, but keeping all the 'signal1' in the result:

" the parser that accepts the symbol #signal1 "
signal := PPPredicateObjectParser expect: #signal1.

" the parser that accepts many symbols #signal1 followed by something else "
pattern := signal plus , signal negate.

data := #(noise1 noise2 noise3 signal1 signal1 signal1 signal1 randomButInteresting noise4 noise5).

pattern flatten matchesSkipIn: data           -> an OrderedCollection(#(#signal1 #signal1 #signal1 #signal1 #randomButInteresting))
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At the moment i will go with the simple answer from Mekanik, but i am very interested in the PetitParser solution. My Problem: The Objects in the Collection are not Strings, but more complex Objects that can be identified as "signal" by certain instance variable values. But i guess, it is possible to also parse streams of non-String Objects with PetitParser? –  Helene Bilbo Aug 6 '12 at 15:22
    
Ok, @LukasRenggli explained this in a comment to his answer. –  Helene Bilbo Aug 11 '12 at 18:18
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The straight method is something like

| data result lastWasSignal |

data := #( #noise1 #noise2 #noise3 #signal1 #signal1 #signal1 #signal1 #randomButInteresting #noise4 #noise5 ).

lastWasSignal := false.
result := data select: [ :value |
    | isElementAppropriate |
    isElementAppropriate := value = #signal1 or: [ lastWasSignal ].
    lastWasSignal := value = #signal1.
    isElementAppropriate
].

result

It's O(n). More clever would be to find bounds of signal group, which occurs only once, using binary search.

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1  
Minor tweak ... use #== instead of #= since you're dealing with Symobls... –  Dale Henrichs Aug 5 '12 at 16:04
    
Right Dale, anyway in VisualAgeST which I use, both #= and #== for Symbol have the same implementation. –  Mekanik Aug 5 '12 at 16:31
    
The binary search you mention might be faster, but since the OP was asking for the most elegant way, I'd say your linear approach is better (especially since the OP wants to "select to a new OrderedCollection"). The collection would have to be absolutely enormous for one to even consider doing a binary search. However, @Dale is correct, you should use #==, even if doesn't make a difference to your flavour of Smalltalk - no harm done in VA and it improves it for us perfectionists ;-). –  Amos M. Carpenter Aug 9 '12 at 9:26
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You can use PetitParser, becase you essentially match a specific pattern on an input stream. The parser definition with some comments added for clarity is the following:

" the parser that accepts the symbol #signal1 "
signal := PPPredicateObjectParser expect: #signal1.

" the parser that accepts the symbol #signal1 not followed by something else "
pattern := signal , signal negate.

" the parser that extract the second symbol "
parser := pattern map: [ :signal :random | random ].

When you run that on your input data you get:

data := #(noise1 noise2 noise3 signal1 signal1 
          signal1 signal1 randomButInteresting
          noise4 noise5).
parser matchesIn: data -> #(randomButInteresting)
share|improve this answer
    
At the moment i will go with the simple answer from Mekanik, but i am very interested in the PetitParser solution. My Problem: The Objects in the Collection are not Strings, but more complex Objects that can be identified as "signal" by certain instance variable values. But i guess, it is possible to also parse streams of non-String Objects with PetitParser? –  Helene Bilbo Aug 6 '12 at 15:21
1  
Sure, PetitParser is not limited to Strings. You can use PPPredicateObjectParser on: [ :obj | " arbitrary condition on object " ] for that. You can find various examples in the tests and in the source code of TextLint. –  Lukas Renggli Aug 8 '12 at 17:40
    
Perfect, Thank you! –  Helene Bilbo Aug 11 '12 at 18:20
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A different solution using an input and an output stream (yes, I like streams :-)):

data := #(noise1 noise2 noise3 signal1 signal1 signal1 signal1 randomButInteresting noise4 noise5).

"Let's create an OrderedCollection from an output stream"
OrderedCollection streamContents: [:output |
    |datast|
    "We are basically streaming on the input data, so let's use a stream:"
    datast := data readStream.
    "We ignore everything before #signal1"
    datast skipTo: #signal1.
    "We add the #signal1we just found"
    output nextPut: #signal1.
    "And we add all the subsequent #signal1"
    [datast peek = #signal1]
        whileTrue: [output nextPut: datast next].
    "Finally we add the element after the last #signal1"
    output nextPut: datast next
    ]
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