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#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int input(int *a)
{
    int n,i;
    printf("enter the no of elements:");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        printf("enter the element:");
        scanf("%d",a++);
    }
    return n;
}
int key_input(int *a,int key)
{
    int k;
    printf("enter the key value which have to be searched in the array of no's provided:");
    scanf("%d",&k);
    return k;
}
void binary_search(int *a,int n,int key)
{
    int low=0;
    int high=n-1;
    int mid;
    while(low<=high)
    {
        mid=(high+low)/2;
        if(key == a[mid])
        {
            printf("the key:%d is found at location:%d in the array",key,mid);
            if(key==a[mid+1])
            {
                binary_search(a+mid+1,n-mid-1,key);
            }
            if(key==a[mid-1])
            {
                binary_search(a,n-mid-1,key);
            }
            if(key != a[mid-1] || key != a[mid+1])
                break;
        }
        else if(key < a[mid])
            high=mid-1;
        else if(key>a[mid])
            low=mid+1;
    }
}
int main()
{
    int arr[100];
    int n=input(arr);
    int key=key_input(arr,n);
    binary_search(arr,n,key);
    return 0;
}

This is the code which I have written for binary search. I want to find out all the array locations in which the key is present. For Example if I give the key as 4 for the input 4,4,4,4. The output should contain all the locations of the array(0-3) but I don't know what's wrong with the code, it is running infinitely. Someone please help me.

share|improve this question
    
Please, please, please learn how to indent your code sanely. It is unreadable as written — or, at least, unnecessarily hard to read. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 5 '12 at 17:17
    
Why do you pass the array to key_input(), and then not use it? The array is irrelevant to the function and should not be passed. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 5 '12 at 17:20
    
How does your binary search report to the calling code the range of locations where the key is found? I would have expected either a structure returned (struct range { int lo; int hi; }) or two pointer arguments that would be set by the code in binary_search(). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 5 '12 at 17:23

1 Answer 1

More than likely what is happening is that your code for moving the high and the low reach a point at which the mid value is always the same which results in an infinite loop. This will depend on the number of items in the array list and whether the number of items is evenly divisible by two or not.

What I will usually do for a binary search is that when the range is sufficiently small, I will just do a sequential search on the final few items in the range.

It sounds like what you want to do is to search an array of integers which is sorted in ascending order and which may have duplicate items in it and find the first array element that matches the integer for which you are searching.

One question is whether you want this function which is doing the search to provide a count of the number of matching items or to just return the first one and let the caller of the function check for any others.

Here are a function prototype for you to consider the interface to a function that will do this.

// search the integer array iValueArray which is a sorted list of integers
// and return the index 0 to iNoArrayElements - 1 of the first integer matching
// the value specified in iSearchValue.  if a match is not found then return -1
int FindFirstMatch (int iSearchValue, int *iValueArray, int iNoArrayElements);

This function would look something like the following.

int FindFirstMatch (int iSearchValue, int *iValueArray, int iNoArrayElements) {
int iRetIndex = -1;

if (iNoArrayElements > 0) {
    int iLowIndex = 0;
    int iHighIndex = iNoArrayElements - 1;
    int iMidIndex = (iHighIndex - iLowIndex) / 2 + iLowIndex;

    while (iLowIndex <= iHighIndex) {
        int iCompare = (iSearchValue - iValueArray[iMidIndex]);

        if (iHighIndex - iLowIndex < 5) {
            // range is small so just do a straight sequential search
            for (iMidIndex = iLowIndex; iMidIndex <= iHighIndex; iMidIndex++) {
                int iCompare = (iSearchValue - iValueArray[iMidIndex]);
                if (iCompare == 0) {
                    // search value equals the mid so we have found a match
                    // now we need to move lower until we find the first of
                    // the series of matching items.
                    iRetIndex = iMidIndex;
                    break;
                }
            }
            break;
        }
        if (iCompare < 0) {
            // search value is lower than mid so move to range below mid
            iHighIndex = iMidIndex;
        } else if (iCompare > 0) {
            // search value is higher than mid so move to range above mid
            iLowIndex = iMidIndex;
        } else {
            // search value equals the mid so we have found a match
            // now we need to move lower until we find the first of
            // the series of matching items.
            iRetIndex = iMidIndex;
            break;
        }
        iMidIndex = (iHighIndex - iLowIndex) / 2 + iLowIndex;
    }
}

if (iRetIndex > 0) {
    while (iRetIndex > 0 && iValueArray[iRetIndex - 1] == iSearchValue) {
        iRetIndex--;
    }
}
return iRetIndex;

}

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