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I am getting some strange result which is best explained by showing the code.

say I create a class A which has 3 methods:
add method - to add other class A instances to be used at later time
_call magic method - to add dynamic vars and there values
_callStatic static magic method - this methods helps me create the A class more readable

and so the class is:

class A_Class {

protected $name;
protected $varList;
protected $childs = array();

protected static $tabCount = 0;

public function __construct($name) {
    $this->name = $name;
}

public function add() {
    if (func_num_args()) { 
        $this->childs = array_merge($this->childs, func_get_args());
    }
    return $this;
}

public function __call($name, $arguments) {
    if (count($arguments) > 0) {
        $this->varList[$name] = $arguments[0];
    }
    return $this;
}

public static function __callStatic($name, $arguments) {
    return new A_Class($name);
}

}

and now when i use it:

$a = A_Class::MyNameA();
$a->someDynamicVar("I am the var data");
$a->add(A_Class::ANotherNameA());
print_r($a);

works just fine resulting in:

A_Class Object
(
    [name:protected] => MyNameA
    [varList:protected] => Array
        (
            [someDynamicVar] => I am the var data
        )

    [childs:protected] => Array
        (
        )
)

But if i try to create class B as inheritance from class A like so:

class B_Class extends A_Class {

public function __construct($name) {
    parent::__construct($name);
    $this->add(A_Class::NewAClass());
}

}

and try the following:

$b = new B_Class("NewBClassInstance");
print_r($b);

I get a recursive result:

B_Class Object
(
    [name:protected] => B-MAN
    [varList:protected] => 
    [childs:protected] => Array
        (
            [0] => B_Class Object
 *RECURSION*
        )
)

to me that is wierd.
it is as iff the __callStatic is being run from the B class and not the A class

any ideas ?

share|improve this question
    
That I find weird, it's to have not a row 'add' containing A_Class instance in your varList, no ? –  Jérôme Boé Aug 5 '12 at 17:41
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1 Answer

Maybe this example will help you understand:

<?php

class A
{
  public function __call($name, $args)
  {
    echo "__call\n";
  }

  static public function __callStatic($name, $args)
  {
    echo "__callStatic\n";
  }
}

class B extends A
{
  public function __construct()
  {
    A::callMe();
  }
}

new B();

The result of running this is:

__call

It does not call the static version. Why? Because B descends from A and thus A::foo() is an ambiguous call when both __call and __callStatic exist.

Keep in mind that within the context of a member function of a class that Class::func() does not mean "call the static method named func in class Class".

It simply means "call Class's function named func". For example:

class A
{
  public function foo() {}
}

class B
{
  public function foo() {}

  public function bar()
  {
    A::foo(); // call A's foo
  }
}

So in your case, the __call method is being called in B's constructor. This is just what PHP does in this ambiguous case. It returns $this which is passed to $this->add(), effectively giving you this: $this->add($this) in B's constructor.

Again, none of these mean "call a static function" within the context of a class' member function:

parent::foo();
self::foo();
static::foo();
A::foo();
B::foo();

They all simply mean "call function foo in the class as referenced by the thing to the left of the ::". Normally you either have an explicit instance function or a static function, so the call is not ambiguous. But when you have both __call and __callStatic, PHP has no way of knowing which you want to call, and it always chooses __call.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. While I understand your answer, id don't understand the logic. to my small understanding it seems like a faulty design –  Yair Aug 6 '12 at 6:38
    
The key point is that Foo::bar() does not mean "call static method named bar" when that appears inside any instance method of a class that derives from Foo. It's not really a fault of PHP; it's a feature. How else are you to call a specific method in the inheritance hierarchy? The only time it is ambiguous is if you have both __call and __callStatic. I'd recommend not using either of those magic methods unless absolutely required. In your case, just create a static method called A::withName($name) and call it like A_Class::withName('NewAClass'). Easier to understand. –  Matthew Aug 6 '12 at 6:44
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