Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run this (2.7.3) I get this output:

'Slotted1' object has no attribute 'c'
attribute c added to <class '__main__.Slotted2'>

I don't understand the difference in behavior between Slotted1 and Slotted2. Can anyone explain?

from ctypes import *

class BracedStructure(Structure):
    def __init__(self, **args):
        super(BracedStructure,self).__init__(**args) 

class Slotted1(Structure):
    __slots__ = ['a','b']
    _fields_ = [('a',c_int8),('b',c_int8)]  
    def __init__(self, **args):
        super(Slotted1,self).__init__(**args)
    def attemptToAddField(self):
        self.c = '?'
        print 'attribute c added to %s' % self.__class__

class Slotted2(BracedStructure):
    __slots__ = ['a','b']
    _fields_ = [('a',c_int8),('b',c_int8)]  
    def __init__(self, **args):
        super(Slotted2,self).__init__(**args)
    def attemptToAddField(self):
        self.c = '?'
        print 'attribute c added to %s' % self.__class__

if '__main__' == __name__:
    s1 = Slotted1(a=1,b=2)
    try:
        s1.attemptToAddField()
    except AttributeError as e:
        print e

    s2 = Slotted2(a=1,b=2)
    try:
        s2.attemptToAddField()
    except AttributeError as e:
        print e
share|improve this question
    
Where is the behavior of _fields_ defined? I assume it's a ctypes thing? –  bukzor Aug 5 '12 at 18:00
    
Nope, it's a Structure thing. –  phunctor Aug 5 '12 at 20:04
    
That doesn't really answer the question. Where is the behavior of Structure._fields_ defined? –  bukzor Aug 6 '12 at 3:44
    
You want to set __slots__ as empty-list on BracedStructure, or more likely, don't set slots anywhere. __slots__ should be considered an implementation detail and a micro-optimization. Only use it if you have a need for extreme speed / memory efficiency, and can demonstrate a benefit from using __slots__. –  bukzor Aug 6 '12 at 3:47
    
slots is used to unduckify BracedStructure subclass instances. There's lots of communications infrastructure that won't know what to do with dynamic attributes. So it's rules enforcement rather than micro optimization. Apart from that, yep. –  phunctor Aug 24 '12 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

Check this out: http://docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#slots

When inheriting from a class without __slots__, the __dict__ attribute of that class will always be accessible, so a __slots__ definition in the subclass is meaningless.

It so happens that BracedStructure has no __slots__, so it overrules __slots__ declaration in Slotted2.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow. That's exactly at the right abstraction level for me to get it. But Ima read the reference datamodel too, I think that's the document I've been looking for. –  phunctor Aug 5 '12 at 20:05

That's because Slotted2 inherited the __dict__ attribute from BracedStructure. So it will accept new arguments regardless of __slots__

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.