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#define B 100+B
main()
{
    int i= B;
}

I know it's wrong, but just out of curiosity, when I compile it I get this weird error "B was not declared in this scope". why is it so ? If this error was because the compiler removes the macro after its substitution then how does the following code worked fine, when B must have been removed before it was made available to A ?

#define B 100
#define A 100+B
main()
{
    int i= B;
    int j =A;
}
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4  
That’s invalid C++, by the way. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 5 '12 at 18:10
3  
Placing spaces on only one side of the = operator is so ugly… –  user1203803 Aug 5 '12 at 18:14
2  
@RadekSlupik But at least they're on different sides in the two lines, which makes it look kind of funny. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 5 '12 at 18:15
2  
@Daniel Fischer: then perhaps you will like this one: blog.aerojockey.com/post/iocccsim –  Karoly Horvath Aug 5 '12 at 18:25
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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's the output of the preprocessor:

gcc -E x.c
# 1 "x.c"
# 1 "<built-in>"
# 1 "<command-line>"
# 1 "x.c"

main()
{
    int i= 100+B;
}

As you can see, it did the substituion. Now comes the compile step which fails because there's no B declared.

The other code is fine, here's the output:

main()
{
    int i= 100;
    int j =100+100;
}
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5  
Preprocessor, not precompiler –  Praetorian Aug 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Thx, fixed it.. –  Karoly Horvath Aug 5 '12 at 18:11
    
How did you generate this preprocessor output code ? –  cirronimbo Aug 5 '12 at 18:31
1  
@cirronimbo It says how right in the answer … –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 5 '12 at 18:35
    
@cirronimbo: if you have visual studio: stackoverflow.com/questions/277258/… –  Karoly Horvath Aug 5 '12 at 20:03
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Macro expansion isn't done recursively, if the macro name appears in the replacement text, it isn't expanded again. So with

#define B 100 + B

a replacement of B yields the token sequence 100 + B and B is not expanded again (if it were, you'd have an infinite recursion). So the compiler sees a reference to the undeclared variable B after the preprocessor finished.

But in

#define B 100
#define A 100 + B

when the macro A is expanded, the macro name B appears in the replacement text. Then B is expanded and the compiler sees 100 + 100 which contains no references to undeclared variables.

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2  
This answer should get a tick. Just sayin'. –  Cat Plus Plus Aug 5 '12 at 18:16
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macro replacement are simple text operation.you can debug this type of problem in a simple step by step compile.

use cc -E filename.c -O filename.i

for generate extended c code

vi filename.i for reading pure/extended c code

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