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I saw the following line in an XML file:

xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"

I have also seen xmlns in many other XML files that I've come across.

What is it?

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3 Answers

up vote 101 down vote accepted

It defines an XML Namespace.

In your example, the Namespace Prefix is "android" and the Namespace URI is "http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"

In the document, you see elements like: <android:foo />

Think of the namespace prefix as a variable with a short name alias for the full namespace URI. It is the equivalent of writing <http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android:foo /> with regards to what it "means" when an XML parser reads the document.

NOTE: You cannot actually use the full namespace URI in place of the namespace prefix in an XML instance document.

Check out this tutorial on namespaces: http://www.sitepoint.com/xml-namespaces-explained/

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2  
I always paste those URIs into a web browser just to see what the parser is looking at, but it always returns 404. Is it supposed to be a real URI that needs a standard filename tacked on to the end, or is it just a technique for making a unique id? –  Patrick Jan 27 at 19:04
2  
@Patrick yes, its just a URI that needs to be unique so as to indicate that it is a separate namespace from others and any potential duplicate tags will therefore be interpreted correctly. So the URI will often point to nothing. –  Foo_Chow Jan 27 at 19:52
    
Hmm...good to know it's a namespace. I used to wonder whether specifying a URI made the html page actually access that website to determine a schema. –  Nav Mar 31 at 12:15
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It means XML namespace.

Basically, every element (or attribute) in XML belongs to a namespace, a way of "qualifying" the name of the element.

Imagine you and I both invent our own XML. You invent XML to describe people, I invent mine to describe cities. Both of us include an element called name. Yours refers to the person’s name, and mine to the city name—OK, it’s a little bit contrived.

<person>
    <name>Rob</name>
    <age>37</age>
    <homecity>
        <name>London</name>
        <lat>123.000</lat>
        <long>0.00</long>
    </homecity>
</person>

If our two XMLs were combined into a single document, how would we tell the two names apart? As you can see above, there are two name elements, but they both have different meanings.

The answer is that you and I would both assign a namespace to our XML, which we would make unique:

<personxml:person xmlns:personxml="http://www.your.example.com/xml/person" xmlns:cityxml="http://www.my.example.com/xml/cities">
    <personxml:name>Rob</personxml:name>
    <personxml:age>37</personxml:age>
    <cityxml:homecity>
        <cityxml:name>London</cityxml:name>
        <cityxml:lat>123.000</cityxml:lat>
        <cityxml:long>0.00</cityxml:long>
    </cityxml:homecity>
</personxml:person>

Now we’ve fully qualified our XML, there is no ambiguity as to what each name element means. All of the tags that start with personxml: are tags belonging to your XML, all the ones that start with cityxml: are mine.

There are a few points to note:

  • If you exclude any namespace declarations, things are considered to be in the default namespace.
  • If you declare a namespace without the identifier, that is, xmlns="http://somenamespace", rather than xmlns:rob="somenamespace", it specifies the default namespace for the document.
  • The actual namespace itself, often a IRI, is of no real consequence. It should be unique, so people tend to choose a IRI/URI that they own, but it has no greater meaning than that. Sometimes people will place the schema (definition) for the XML at the specified IRI, but that is a convention of some people only.
  • The prefix is of no consequence either. The only thing that matters is what namespace the prefix is defined as. Several tags beginning with different prefixes, all of which map to the same namespace are considered to be the same.
  • Attributes can be qualified but are generally not. They also do not inherit their namespace from the element they are on, as opposed to elements (see below).

Also, element namespaces are inherited from the parent element. In other words I could equally have written the above XML as

<person xmlns="http://www.your.example.com/xml/person">
    <name>Rob</name>
    <age>37</age>
    <homecity xmlns="http://www.my.example.com/xml/cities">
        <name>London</name>
        <lat>123.000</lat>
        <long>0.00</long>
    </homecity>
</person>
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+1 for writing an essay. –  Noldorin Jul 25 '09 at 11:48
55  
That kind of answer is what's making this site so good! Having the answer instead of pointing to it is what makes this site better than Google! –  Brad Bruce Jul 25 '09 at 15:12
3  
+1 good, helpful conceptual answer. You may want to qualify "Basically, every element (or attribute) in xml belongs to a namespace", since some elements and attributes are said to be in "no namespace". Though I understand you were giving the basics. –  LarsH Aug 18 '11 at 12:05
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very nice explanation +1 –  Peter Sep 5 '12 at 11:27
    
@Rob Levine "Attributes can be namespaced but are generally not." What about Android ? –  bluesm Sep 2 '13 at 13:49
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You have name spaces so you can have globally unique elements. However, 99% of the time this doesn't really matter, but when you put it in the perspective of The Semantic Web, it starts to become important.

For example, you could make an XML mash-up of different schemes just by using the appropriate xmlns. For example, mash up friend of a friend with vCard, etc.

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