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I'm trying to remove duplicate JavaScript code. I have a page with many <input type="file">. Each loads an image and performs some distinct processing. The problem is that I have many duplicates of the following code:

inputFile1.onchange = function (e) {
        var file = e.target.files[0];
        if (typeof file == 'undefined' || file == null) {
            return;
        }
        var imageType = /image.*/;
        if (!file.type.match(imageType)) {
            window.alert('Bad file type!');
            return;
        }
        var reader = new FileReader();
        reader.onloadend = function (e) {
            var imageLoader = new Image();
            imageLoader.onload = function () {
                // process image
            };
            imageLoader.src = e.target.result;
        };
        reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    };

inputFile2.onchange = ... (repeats all but process image)
inputFile3.onchange = ... (repeats all but process image)

Only the code at process image comment varies. How can I remove the surrounding duplicate code?

I know that JavaScript functions are objects. How can I define a function object and create one distinct instance for each event handler, passing a different function for process image to each object?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can make a generator for such functions with a closure taking the individual callback as an argument:

function getChangeHandler(loadCallback) {
    return function (e) {
        var file = e.target.files[0];
        if (typeof file == 'undefined' || file == null) {
            return;
        }
        var imageType = /image.*/;
        if (!file.type.match(imageType)) {
            window.alert('Bad file type!');
            return;
        }
        var reader = new FileReader();
        reader.onloadend = function (e) {
            var imageLoader = new Image();
            imageLoader.onload = loadCallback; // <= uses the closure argument
            imageLoader.src = e.target.result;
        };
        reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    };
}
inputFile1.onchange = getChangeHandler(function() { /* custom process image */ });
inputFile2.onchange = getChangeHandler(function() { /* custom process image */ });
inputFile3.onchange = getChangeHandler(function() { /* custom process image */ });

An other, eventually superior approach would be to use only one change-event handler for all inputs, that dynamically chooses the custom image processor by the name or id of the input:

var imageProcessors = {
    "box1": function() { … },
    "anotherbox": function() { … },
    …
};
function changeHandler(e) {
    var input = this; // === e.target
    …
    reader.onloadend = function (e) {
        …
        imageLoader.onload = imageProcessors[input.id];
    };
}
// and bind this one function on all inputs (jQuery-style):
$("#box1, #anotherbox, …").click(changeHandler);
share|improve this answer

You can write a function that returns a function:

function processFile(callback) { //callback is the unique file processing routine
    return function(e) {
        var file = e.target.files[0];
        if (typeof file == 'undefined' || file == null) {
            return;
        }
        var imageType = /image.*/;
        if (!file.type.match(imageType)) {
            window.alert('Bad file type!');
            return;
        }
        var reader = new FileReader();
        reader.onloadend = function (e) {
            var imageLoader = new Image();
            imageLoader.onload = callback; //Put it here!
            imageLoader.src = e.target.result;
        };
        reader.readAsDataURL(file);
    };
}

Then call like this:

inputFile1.onchange = processFile(function() {
      //file processing for number 1
});
inputFile2.onchange = processFile(function() {
      //file processing for number 2
});
inputFile3.onchange = processFile(function() {
      //file processing for number 3
});
share|improve this answer
    
No need to use a function that returns a function. Just assign onchange to the common function. –  jfriend00 Aug 5 '12 at 21:37
1  
@jfriend00 There still needs to be a way to associate the non-common function to the input[type="file"]. –  Dennis Aug 5 '12 at 21:44
    
Huh? You can get the object causing the event from the e parameter and I don't see you doing anything extra with the extra level of function. It doesn't look required to me. –  jfriend00 Aug 5 '12 at 21:49
    
Nowhere did I say it was required, it's just one possible solution. –  Dennis Aug 5 '12 at 21:55
    
And I'm just saying there's no purpose to it other than added complication. Just make your inner function be processFile and remove the outer level and it works just as well with one less level of complication. –  jfriend00 Aug 5 '12 at 21:57

Here's an EMCA5 solution, just to throw it into the mix. It binds a dynamic event callback depending on the element.

I've assumed each field has an ID (input1 etc) but with some modification of the code (i.e. identifying the trigger element by some other means) this wouldn't be necessary.

Array.prototype.slice.call(document.querySelectorAll('input[type=file]')).forEach(function(element) {

    /* prepare code specific to the element */
    var input_specific_code = (function() {
        switch (element.id) {
            case 'input1': return function() { /* #input1 code here */ };
            case 'input2': return function() { /* #input2 code here */ };
            case 'input3': return function() { /* #input3 code here */ };
        }
    })();

    element.addEventListener('change', (function(input_specific_code) { return function(evt) {
        var id_of_trigger_input = element.id;

        /* common code here */

        /* element-specific code */
        input_specific_code();

        /* continuation of common code */

    }; })(input_specific_code), false);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Why not put element.id directly in the switch? Also, this approach would create n functions that all include codes for all n inputs, but need only one of them. –  Bergi Aug 5 '12 at 21:42
    
True enough - I was just 'sketching' in ECMA5. Modified to use a closure instead. –  Utkanos Aug 5 '12 at 21:52

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