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Im new to rails and I want to make a select query based on diffrent GET params (filtering and sorting). Can I some how add conditions to find in the code?

For example:

if params[:ratings] 
  Movie.where(:rating => params[:ratings].keys)
end

and then add ordering and other where conditions. How can I achive this? Maybe there is a better way to dybamicly modify select query (without making SQL string). Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The where, order, ... methods return ActiveRecord::Relation objects so you can keep calling more query methods:

query = Movie
if(params[:ratings])
  query = query.where(:rating => params[:ratings].keys)
end
if(params[:some_order_param])
  query = query.order(params[:some_order_param])
end
# Keep adding more 'where', 'order', 'group', ... methods as needed ...
results = query.all
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Ah, genius. I had been struggling with how to get "start out" the default query, mistakenly calling Movie.all -- this is simple! And to keep it all nice and tidy, one could even keep each potential filter on a single line with query = query.order(params[:some_order_param]) if params[:some_order_param]. Rails is a thing of beauty and constant delight! –  Tom Harrison Jr Aug 6 '12 at 0:13

I'd actually recommend the has_scope gem for this type of behavior. It allows you to define scopes and class methods on your models and automatically use them for filtering, ordering, etc in the controllers.

Here's a small example from the docs, but there's a lot you can do with it:

class Graduation < ActiveRecord::Base
  scope :featured, where(:featured => true)
end

class GraduationsController < ApplicationController
  has_scope :featured, :type => :boolean
end
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