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I want to test if an ordered set is a subset of a bigger ordered set. I used tuples and itertools.combinations:

def subset_test(a, b):
    return a in itertools.combinations(b, len(a))

For instance,

>>> subset_test((0, 1, 2), (0, 3, 1, 4, 2))
True

It works, but is slow when I test big tuples.

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1  
Does order matter? –  jamylak Aug 5 '12 at 22:13
    
Yes, @jamylak. I updated the question. –  Marcos da Silva Sampaio Aug 5 '12 at 22:17
    
@senderle, Could you suggest a better term? I want to test if A is a subset of the ordered set B. –  Marcos da Silva Sampaio Aug 5 '12 at 22:21
    
Regarding your original code, there is no need to call list, you can check membership in a generator too and it will save one run through the combinations. –  jamylak Aug 5 '12 at 22:52
    
Thanks, @jamylak. I updated the question again. –  Marcos da Silva Sampaio Aug 5 '12 at 23:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can simply use an iterator to keep track of the position in B

>>> A = (0, 1, 2)
>>> B = (0, 3, 1, 4, 2)
>>> b_iter = iter(B)
>>> all(a in b_iter for a in A)
True
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1  
Oh, wow! I see why this works, but it looks like black magic. Is the behavior of in in this case guaranteed? –  senderle Aug 5 '12 at 23:32
    
+1 I agree this is magic! –  jamylak Aug 6 '12 at 0:11
    
also most efficient –  jamylak Aug 6 '12 at 0:39

Simple way of doing this

>>> a = (0, 1, 2)
>>> b = (0, 3, 1, 4, 2)
>>> filter(set(a).__contains__, b) == a
True

For greater efficiency use itertools

>>> from itertools import ifilter, imap
>>> from operator import eq
>>> all(imap(eq, ifilter(set(a).__contains__, b), a))
True
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1  
or filter(functools.partial(operator.contains, a), b) etc. –  gnibbler Aug 5 '12 at 23:49
    
@gnibbler Would you say that it's better to do it like that or is it ok to use special methods in this case? –  jamylak Aug 6 '12 at 0:20
    
The special method version seems to run about twice as fast. List comprehension seems to be slowest of all. –  gnibbler Aug 6 '12 at 1:29

This should get you started

>>> A = (0, 1, 2)
>>> B = (0, 3, 1, 4, 2)
>>> b_idxs = {v:k for k,v in enumerate(B)}
>>> idxs = [b_idxs[i] for i in A]
>>> idxs == sorted(idxs)
True

If the list comprehension throws a KeyError, then obviously the answer is also False

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Here's a linear time approach (in the longest set) that doesn't require any hashing. It takes advantage of the fact that, since both sets are ordered, earlier items in the set don't need to be re-checked:

>>> def subset_test(a, b):
...     b = iter(b)
...     try:
...         for i in a:
...             j = b.next()
...             while j != i:
...                 j = b.next()
...     except StopIteration:
...         return False
...     return True
... 

A few tests:

>>> subset_test((0, 1, 2), (0, 3, 1, 4, 2))
True
>>> subset_test((0, 2, 1), (0, 3, 1, 4, 2))
False
>>> subset_test((0, 1, 5), (0, 3, 1, 4, 2))
False
>>> subset_test((0, 1, 4), (0, 3, 1, 4, 2))
True

I'm pretty sure this is right -- let me know if you see any problems.

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This should be pretty quick, but I have a faster one in mind I hope to have down soon:

def is_sorted_subset(A, B):
    try:
      subset = [B.index(a) for a in A]
      return subset == sorted(subset)
    except ValueError:
      return False

Update: here's the faster one I promised.

def is_sorted_subset(A, B):
  max_idx = -1
  try:
    for val in A:
      idx = B[max_idx + 1:].index(val)
      if max(idx, max_idx) == max_idx:
        return False
      max_idx = idx
  except ValueError:
    return False
  return True
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Note that this could become slow if B is huge since list.index is O(N) –  jamylak Aug 5 '12 at 22:43
    
@jamylak yeah, thanks, the faster solution is posted now. –  kojiro Aug 5 '12 at 22:57

What about this?

>>> a = (0, 1, 2)
>>> b = (0, 3, 1, 4, 2)
>>> set(a).issubset(set(b))
True

In this example a and b have ordered and unique elements and it checks if a is subset of b. Is this you want?

EDIT:

According to @Marcos da Silva Sampaio: "I want to test if A is a subset of the ordered set B."

It wouldn't be the case of:

>>> a = (2, 0, 1)
>>> b = (0, 3, 1, 4, 2)
>>> set(b).issuperset(a)
True  

In this case the order of a doesn't matters.

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The elements of a may not be ordered correctly eg. (2, 1, 0) in (0, 3, 1, 4, 2) –  jamylak Aug 5 '12 at 22:57
    
Ops... sorry... my mistake –  rcovre Aug 5 '12 at 22:58

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