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Consider that in some library somewhere (which we have no access to change), we have a Counter class:

class Counter {
    int count;
  public:
    Counter() : count(0) { }
    void bump() { ++count; }
    int getCount() const { return count; }
};

which, by its very nature, is mutable. If it's const, it's pretty worthless.

And in our code, we "use" that Counter. Badly.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <Counter.hpp>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void breakTheHellOutOfCounter(Counter &c) {
    // This is OK
    c.bump();

    // Oh noes!
    c = Counter();
}

int main() {
    Counter c;
    c.bump(); c.bump(); c.bump();
    std::cout << "Count was " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
    breakTheHellOutOfCounter(c);
    std::cout << "Count is now " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
}

Note that breakTheHellOutOfCounter overwrites main's counter with a shiny new one, resetting the count. That's going to cause the caller some grief. (Imagine something a lot more harmful happening, and you'll see where I'm going here.)

I need to be able to bump c (and thus, I need it mutable), but I want breakTheHellOutOfCounter() to fail miserably due to trying to replace c. Is there a way I can change things (other than the Counter class) to make that happen?

(I'm aware that at the lowest levels, this is all but impossible to enforce. What I want is a way to make it hard to do accidentally.)

share|improve this question
1  
To get this out of the way: Altering Counter to not include an operator= is not an option? – delnan Aug 5 '12 at 23:58
    
Just a couple points. There's nothing inherently wrong with the count member not being mutable; you can make it a mutable member of whatever other class you use it in if appropriate. No client code is going to write c = Counter() and accidentally reset the counter; is the problematic scenario really accidental memberwise copying of objects it's embedded in? If so, you might make the container classes non-copyable... (best syntax varies across C++03 / C++11 but can easily be googled). – Tony D Aug 6 '12 at 0:44
    
@delnan: Not really. I mean, for types i've created it'd be an option, but if i'm stuck using someone else's stuff, i need to know how to minimize the potential damage. :) – cHao Aug 6 '12 at 1:14
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simplest way to do this is to remove the assignment operator from the Counter class. However, since you don't have the ability to change the Counter class, your only real option is to wrap the Counter class in a class with no assignment operator and use that instead.

share|improve this answer

The cleanest solution I can see to this without modifying counter itself is something like:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <Counter.hpp>

template <typename T>
struct Unbreakable : public T {
  Unbreakable<T>& operator=(const Unbreakable<T>&) = delete;
  Unbreakable<T>& operator=(Unbreakable<T>&&) = delete;

  template <typename ...Args>
  Unbreakable(Args&& ...args) : T(std::forward<Args>(args)...) {}
};

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void breakTheHellOutOfCounter(Unbreakable<Counter> &c) {
    // this is ok
    c.bump();

    // oh noes!
    c = Counter();
}


int main() {
    Unbreakable<Counter> c;
    c.bump(); c.bump(); c.bump();
    std::cout << "Count was " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
    breakTheHellOutOfCounter(c);
    std::cout << "Count is now " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
}

Which correctly gives an error from your "oh noes" line. (Example uses C++11, but C++98 solution is similar)

That doesn't rule out usage like:

Counter& br = c;
br = Counter();

of course, but without modifying Counter itself I don't think that's avoidable.

share|improve this answer

As Michael Anderson said, you can wrap your counter object in a class that prevents assignment.

class CounterProxy {
    Counter& counter;
    CounterProxy & operator=(const CounterProxy&);
public:
    CounterProxy(Counter& c) : counter(c) {}
    void bump() { counter.bump(); }
    int getCount() const { return counter.getCount(); }
};

void breakTheHellOutOfCounter(CounterProxy &c) {
    // this is ok
    c.bump();

    // not oh noes!
    c = CounterProxy(Counter());
}

int main() {
    Counter c;
    c.bump(); c.bump(); c.bump();
    std::cout << "Count was " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
    breakTheHellOutOfCounter(CounterProxy(c));
    std::cout << "Count is now " << c.getCount() << std::endl;
}

You can use this method whenever you want to limit the operations that can be performed on an object.

EDIT: You're probably already aware of this and looking for a more elegant solution, but the code might help others.

share|improve this answer
    
It might not be as elegant, but it gets stuff done. And since it doesn't involve inheriting from Counter (and thus regaining the unwanted = operator in some cases), it's also harder to break. :) +1 – cHao Aug 6 '12 at 14:21

By allowing bump via a mutable reference, you are giving the function access to mess with the object state. There is nothing special about assignment; it's just a function that mutates the object in some way. It could just as well be a function called CopyStateFromAnotherInstance() instead of operator =().

So the real problem is: How do you allow only certain functions but hide others? By using an interface:

class IBumpable
{
    void bump() ...
};

class Counter : IBumpable
{
    ....
};

void functionThatCannotBreakCounter(IBumpable& counter) { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
How does this keep me from saying counter = Counter();, though? – cHao Aug 6 '12 at 1:38
    
because IBumpable doesn't have an operator =()... it won't compile. – tenfour Aug 6 '12 at 10:34
    
I thought there was a trivial assignment operator unless you remove it or declare it as private or something? – cHao Aug 6 '12 at 12:40
    
Anyway...this would require modifying Counter, which isn't an option in this example. – cHao Aug 6 '12 at 12:43

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