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The title of the question pretty much says it: is there a way for an R function to find out if it is being called directly or from inside a for or while loop? sys.frame(0) or parent.frame(1) returns .GlobalEnv whether the function was called directly or from inside one of those loops. So, is there some other way?

Thanks.

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1  
I think the context of this problem is important to give good advice. What is your purpose? What are you attempting to do? –  Tyler Rinker Aug 6 '12 at 1:30
    
I've written a wrapper function for <<- that keeps a log changes to global objects along with timestamps (stackoverflow.com/questions/11813599/…). That works great. Now, I'd like it to notice when it's being called from a loop and instead of logging e.g. foo[ii] <<- mean(bar[ii+1,]) dozens of times, log just one such operation and note that it was a loop. Or maybe log it, but substitute in the value of ii on each cycle. Perhaps there is a way to programmatically peek at history? –  f1r3br4nd Aug 6 '12 at 1:38
    
@f1r3br4nd The only thing that comes to mind is ?loadhistory. I know there are some questions on SO with people hacking their histories, you might consider poking around for those. –  joran Aug 6 '12 at 1:41
1  
have you looked at the track and SOAR packages on CRAN, if tracking objects is what you intend on doing? –  mnel Aug 6 '12 at 6:32

4 Answers 4

Unfortunately for doesn't appear in sys.calls normally. While its a bit of a hack, you can actually override for, causing it to be included:

`for` = function(iter, vec, expr) eval.parent(replace(sys.call(), 1, list(.Primitive('for'))))
in.for = function() '`for`' %in% lapply(sys.calls(), `[[`, 1)
my.fun = function() { print('before'); print(in.for()); print('after') }

my.fun()
# [1] "before"
# [1] FALSE
# [1] "after"
for (x in 1) my.fun()
# [1] "before"
# [1] TRUE
# [1] "after"
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Oops, that was premature. Turns out that the index variable does persist after a for() loop. Darn.

Hmm! I might have it. I already have a function that replaces an arbitrary string in a function with the contents of a variable:

replaceincall <- function(xx,from,to){
  # from is a string, to is a name
  if(is.name(xx)){
    ifelse(as.character(xx)==from,return(to),return(xx));
  } else {
    if(is.call(xx)) {
      oo <- lapply(as.list(xx),function(yy) replaceincall(yy,from,to));
      return(as.call(oo));
    } else {
      return(xx);
    }
  }
}

In my overloaded <<- function, I also already extract a list of names from sys.call() that do not correspond to functions. That means they are some kind of variable. All I have to do is find the ones that are not in ls(.GlobalEnv) and those must be the ones that are index variables and should be replaced with their values in the log entry (using the above function).

Now, this might catch and replace stuff besides loops... but perhaps that's a good thing because regardless of the reason a variable isn't in .GlobalEnv, it's still a dynamic variable and therefore someday when I'm looking through the log I'm going to wonder how to reconstruct it if I don't capture it's value right now.

Does anybody see any flaws in this reasoning?

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Please use the Post answer button only for actual answers. You should modify your original question to add additional information. –  Andrie Aug 6 '12 at 4:53

This is not a definitive answer, but I think your solution will be to look at the sys.status, specifically the sys.parents. The second example is for when the function is called within another function, and within a loop. Not sure how you differentiate this without knowing explicitly.

test <- function() sys.status()

for(i in 1:2){
  print(test())
 }


## $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## print(test())
## 
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[3]]
## sys.status()
## 
##
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 0 2
##
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x0479a1c8>
##
## $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x0479a2fc>
##
## $sys.frames[[3]]
## <environment: 0x0479a334>
##
##
## $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## print(test())
##
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[3]]
## sys.status()
##
##
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 0 2
## 
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x047993cc>
## 
## $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x04799570>

## $sys.frames[[3]]
## <environment: 0x047995a8>

and

test()

## $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## sys.status()
## 
## 
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 1
## 
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x04775500>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x04775538>

and

test_sq <- function() test()

for(i in 1:2){
  print(test_sq())
 }

## $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## print(test_sq())
## 
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## test_sq()
## 
## $sys.calls[[3]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[4]]
## sys.status()
## 
## 
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 0 2 3
## 
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x04766c60>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x04766dcc>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[3]]
## <environment: 0x04766e04>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[4]]
## <environment: 0x04766e3c>
##   
##   
##   $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## print(test_sq())
## 
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## test_sq()
## 
## $sys.calls[[3]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[4]]
## sys.status()
## 
## 
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 0 2 3
## 
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x04765ac8>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x04765c34>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[3]]
## <environment: 0x04765c6c>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[4]]
## <environment: 0x04765d30>

and

test_sq()


## $sys.calls
## $sys.calls[[1]]
## test_sq()
## 
## $sys.calls[[2]]
## test()
## 
## $sys.calls[[3]]
## sys.status()
## 
## 
## $sys.parents
## [1] 0 1 2
## 
## $sys.frames
## $sys.frames[[1]]
## <environment: 0x0475ce40>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[2]]
## <environment: 0x0475cee8>
##   
##   $sys.frames[[3]]
## <environment: 0x0475cf20>
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Why don't you just use a optional parameter for example

Blah <- function(Param1, OptionalParam = 0){
    if(OptionalParam == 1){
        #Do This
    }else{
        #Do this
    }
    #Everything Else
}
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This is R code? –  Jason Morgan Aug 6 '12 at 1:41
    
I see-- since I know I'm calling it from a loop, explicitly tell it to the function. One problem is that my function is by design a binary operator. I can probably get around that by an options() setting. But the bigger problem is that if I package it up for other people to use (because boy does it solve a long-ignored problem) manually telling it that it's in a loop is much less user friendly than automagically detecting loops and logging them differently than explicit calls. –  f1r3br4nd Aug 6 '12 at 1:46
    
Aw, come on, don't vote parent responder down folks. He might have missed the part about this being R language, but the suggestion he made is relevant to my question, even if I can't do it that way because of the reasons above. –  f1r3br4nd Aug 6 '12 at 1:56
    
Yes i would agree it would be easier to check from within function but the only information sent when calling a function are the parameters of that function. You could try making a module that assigns a parent to a function which would then allow you to set the parent calling type but that would be just as non user friendly. using a optional parameter would be the easiest and then just put some good commenting to help other developers –  Alex Murray Aug 6 '12 at 1:57
1  
@AlexMurray f13br4nd has mentioned that it's a binary operator so it's not really possible to send in other optional parameters directly. –  Dason Aug 6 '12 at 2:04

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