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Not completely sure how I can phrase this question best. How can I compare each element of a list with each elements of the same list only once.

For instance:

var textlist = ["a", "b", "c"];
var intersecting = from string a in textlist
                   from string b in textlist
                   where a != b && a.SomeCondition(b)
                   select new
                   {
                       object1 = a,
                       object2 = b
                   };

Assuming "a" gives 'True' to "SomeCondition" with "b", I want the final result to be:

[["a, b"]]

Whereas now it would be:

[["a, b"], ["b, a"]]

Is this possible with a Linq Query?

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what do you expect if your input is {"a", "a", "b", "c"}? –  Dmitry Khryukin Aug 6 '12 at 1:55
    
I assumed you want to compare {[a,b], [a,c], [b,c]} only if the list of string is a, b, c? –  John Woo Aug 6 '12 at 3:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way is to compare each element to just the elements located after it:

string[] textlist = {"a", "b", "c"};
var intersecting = from aIndex in Enumerable.Range(0, textlist.Count())
                   from b in textlist.Skip(aIndex + 1)
                   let a = textlist.ElementAt(aIndex)
                   where a != b && a.SomeCondition(b)
                   select new
                   {
                       object1 = a,
                       object2 = b
                   };

Note: This solution, along with most solutions to this problem that use LINQ, will be horribly inefficient if used on an IEnumerable that is expensive to enumerate.

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Not 100% sure you have the "best(tm)" solution, but it's exactly the one I was looking for. The others didn't work unless I made comparison operators, So I am marking this as answered. –  HotStuff68 Aug 7 '12 at 2:41
    
@HotStuff I'm glad it's what you want! I believe it is a very efficient solution for eagerly evaluated collections because, unlike the comparison solutions, it compares each element to just a portion of the other elements. Also, if where a != b is just to prevent comparing an element to itself, then it is not needed because b will always be an element after a. And if you want this solution to be efficient with lazily evaluated collections you can convert them to eager collections before working with them. –  Risky Martin Aug 7 '12 at 14:27

You could use a value comparison - i.e only deal with pairs where a > b. You could even replace your a != b with a > b, as the inequality would be implied:

var textlist = ["a", "b", "c"];
var intersecting = from string a in textlist
               from string b in textlist
               where a > b && (a.SomeCondition(b) || b.SomeCondition(a))
               select new
               {
                   object1 = a,
                   object2 = b
               };
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i've come up with your desired result by adding CompareTo condtion:

string[] textlist = new string[] {"a", "b", "c"};
var intersecting =  from string a in textlist
                    from string b in textlist
                    where ((a != b) && (a.CompareTo(b) == -1)) // && a.SomeCondition(b)
                    select new { object1 = a, object2 = b }
                    ;

intersecting.Dump("Result");

here's the screenshot of the result

enter image description here

you can just remove the extra // to uncomment your condition.

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Here's another way to do it in case you can't use > between your objects or if your collection can contain duplicates. It works by using an overload of SelectMany and Where that passes in the index to the item in the collection. I realise it's not that readable but I think it is more robust.

        string[] data = "A,A,B,C".Split(',');
        var query = data.SelectMany((x1, i1) => data.Where((x2, i2) => i2 > i1 && x1.SomeCondition(x2)).Select(x2 => new { object1 = x1, object2 = x2 }));
        foreach (var item in query) Console.WriteLine(item.object1 + "," + item.object2);
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