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I am working on a project Online examination just to gain knowledge. There can be a case of power failure and when a candidate logs in again, then the time wasted during power failure must be given. But in my javascript code, the exam ends after exact 2 hours corresponding to server time(AJAX is used here). After time ends, the student is redirected to home page. I have thought of a solution but I dont find a start to implement it.

As the session is maintained, so I can maintain the time he used from 2 hours and can be stored in database. when he relogin then that particular row which corresponds to him can be checked and the time can be updated.

But I am not able to implement it. Please tell me if there is another solution to it or the direction in which I am thinking is right or wrong.

The exam clock resumes from the start of 2 hours. It doesn't resume from the time which was ticking when the power failure was there. Its the same thing whether a power failure occurs or a candidate logs back again in this case atleast. And I am not asking for any code for this problem. I just want a hint or a direction in which I can think of. I just want to know what can be the concept behind it.

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Can you please clarify a bit? Does the 'examination clock' only resume after the candidate logs back in or when the system comes back online? Is the question purely how to implement this scheme? Can you post a concise summary of what's implemented? –  John Carter Aug 6 '12 at 2:08
    
The exam clock resumes from the start of 2 hours. It doesn't resume from the time which was ticking when the power failure was there. Its the same thing whether a power failure occurs or a candidate logs back again in this case atleast. And I am not asking for any code for this problem. I just want a hint or a direction in which I can think of. I just want to know what can be the concept behind it. –  Neha Choudhary Aug 6 '12 at 2:14
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From my understanding, you are doing an online examination system where there is a chance of power failure or some other reason due to which the timer should stop. I think it might be a good idea to have the client-side send a "heartbeat" signal to the server every 5 seconds or so. If the "heartbeat" stops, the server knows the client died (due to power failure, accidental closing of tab etc) and can stop the clock and start it when the test-taker logs in again. Please update your question if my understanding is incorrect –  Jayraj Aug 6 '12 at 2:52
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On the server-side, the way to implement a "heartbeat" might be to store the timestamp of the last "heartbeat" corresponding to a user or the exam being taken by the user, in the database. Whenever a "heartbeat" is received, check the timestamp on the previously stored "heartbeat" and if the difference between now and the stored timestamp is greater than 5 seconds, then you know that the client died at the time of the stored timestamp (+- 5 seconds) –  Jayraj Aug 6 '12 at 2:57
    
@Jayraj Yes, thats what I want to do. I exactly wanted to do that. Thanks for the answer. I could not find how to start it. But now I can do this. Thank you. :) –  Neha Choudhary Aug 6 '12 at 3:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Formalizing the problem a bit:

  • A user logins in and begins their exam at t0. Their exam concludes at t120.
  • At some point (x minutes into exam) before the end of the exam (tx) there is a power failure and those being tested must resume the exam.
  • At some point after tx, ty the system comes back online.
  • At some point after or equal to ty, the user logs in again, call it tz. As you've indicated, this is equal to ty.
  • They're entitled to 120 - x more minutes to complete the exam. The point at which the exam concludes is now tz + (120 - x).

Possible Solution:

Originally thought of a very session-oriented approach, but this might be the way to go:

  • Implement a system wide clock (think "heartbeat") with a period p. For every interval p that the system is up, increment a global counter.
  • Record t0 as this global counter for each examination.
  • In another row, update the elapsed time an examination. This is the current value of t0. In your code you'll likely have functionality to save their work in progress, update the elapsed time there. Also update the elapsed time on each page/section load. Note that if some work is lost between the last elapsed time update/in progress save, they'll receive that time 'back' since their last elapsed update was never stored.
  • The interval p will be a policy decision. In theory someone could gain an extra p to complete their exam depending on the timing of the failure. If p is 1 second, it's not a big deal. If it's 5 minutes, it's a bigger deal. Of course there will be performance tradeoffs for different values of p. Also since we're not dealing with real-time systems here, there can be some skew with p.
  • Use transactions for everything. When the system resumes (and before the global clock starts ticking again), any transactions interrupted will need to be rolled back.
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My solution was focused primarily on a power failure server-side. @Jayraj 's comment above can likely be folded into this to account for client side disconnects (if that's desired). –  John Carter Aug 6 '12 at 3:07
    
Both solutions are accepted. Thank you both. :) –  Neha Choudhary Aug 6 '12 at 3:09
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you can use Websockets to implement the client server communication. Websockets provides its own healthchek. It has methods like onOpen() and onClose() which receives events on opening or closing of connections.

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