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I have a function which opens a file from storage and returns back a Boolean specified that the file opened just fine.

private async Task<bool> SaveImage()
{
    try
    {
        await filesave.openAsync(FileAccessMode.ReadWrite)
    }
    catch()
    {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

I want to call the await SaveImage() function, but somehow want a listener/event handler which tells me when this has completed.. upon completion I want to update my layout with new data. How is this possible using the new WINRT async/ await async methodology for windows 8? is there a work around/substitute.

How can I setup a event handler type scenario? (on complete)

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3 Answers 3

You just await a call to your method, and follow it with the code that should run when it's completed. You don't need to manually register an event handler.

var succeeded = await SaveImage();
// Because of the "await" keyword in the above line, the current method
// will not continue until "SaveImage" has completed its async work and
// signaled its Task
if (succeeded) { ... }

Of course, since the above code uses the await keyword, it needs to be placed inside a method that's also marked async. If that method needs to signal its completion to its caller, then it should also return a Task or Task<T>; for example:

private async Task<string> MyHelperMethod() {
    var succeeded = await SaveImage();
    if (succeeded)
        return "Success";
    else
        return "Failure";
}
// then, in some other method:
    var message = await MyHelperMethod();

Or, if the method calling SaveImage is the end of the line -- say it's the handler for a Button's Click event -- then it can be async void:

private async void ButtonClick(object sender, EventArgs args) {
    var succeeded = await SaveImage();
    if (succeeded) { ... }
}
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Note: although the rest of the lines in the method wait for the awaited method to complete, the method that called that method is given control flow execution. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/hh191443.aspx –  micahhoover Mar 2 '13 at 1:34

Joe's answer looks great, though if you insist on using an event - for example if your SaveImage() calls are in various areas of code unrelated to updating the layout - you can just raise an event when your operation completes. You can use the plain old CLR events or use a pub-sub pattern implementation like the EventAggregator from Prism or Messenger from MVVM Light. The POCE version could look like this

public event EventHandler<Tuple<StorageFile,bool>> SaveImageCompleted;

private async Task<bool> SaveImage(StorageFile file)
{
    try
    {
        await file.OpenAsync(FileAccessMode.ReadWrite);
    }
    catch
    {
        if (SaveImageCompleted != null)
            SaveImageCompleted(this, new Tuple<StorageFile, bool>(file, false));

        return false;
    }

    if (SaveImageCompleted != null)
        SaveImageCompleted(this, new Tuple<StorageFile, bool>(file, true));

    return true;
}
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This takes a little more code but is a VERY cool and useful way to deal with async operations, progress, cancellations and complete status in general. This was compiled in a VS2012 Winrt Store App and I ran it off a button click as you see here.

    private void Save_File_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        // create your op, bool = return type, string = progress report
        IAsyncOperationWithProgress<bool, string> op;

        // Call our async operation with progress sending the file name
        op = OpenFileWithProgress("test.txt");

        //  not implemented here
        //op.Cancel(); 

        // when we get a progress update...
        op.Progress = (info, progress) =>
        {
            // I'm just giving text feed back to user here
            Debug.WriteLine(progress);
        };
        op.Completed = (info, status) =>
        {
            // check status for completion or cancellation...
            switch (status)
            {
                case AsyncStatus.Completed:
                    //  Do your completed work here
                    Debug.WriteLine("Completed");
                    break;
                case AsyncStatus.Canceled:
                    // Operation canceled - not implemented...
                    Debug.WriteLine("Canceled");
                    break;
                default:
                    // default stuff here
                    break;
            }
        };
    }

    public IAsyncOperationWithProgress<bool, string> OpenFileWithProgress(string fileName)
    {
        return System.Runtime.InteropServices.WindowsRuntime.AsyncInfo.Run<bool, string>((token, progress) =>
            Task.Run<bool>(async () =>
            {
                progress.Report("Starting");
                try
                {
                    StorageFile file = await ApplicationData.Current.LocalFolder.CreateFileAsync(fileName);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    return false;
                }

                progress.Report("Finished");

                return true;

            }, token));
    }
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