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I'm trying to parse a csv file I made with Google Spreadsheet. It's very simple for testing purposes, and is basically:

1,2
3,4
5,6

The problem is that the csv doesn't end in a newline character so when I cat the file in BASH, I get

MacBook-Pro:Desktop kkSlider$ cat test.csv 
1,2 
3,4 
5,6MacBook-Pro:Desktop kkSlider$ 

I just want to read line by line in a BASH script using a while loop that every guide suggests, and my script looks like this:

while IFS=',' read -r last first
do
    echo "$last $first"
done < test.csv

The output is:

MacBook-Pro:Desktop kkSlider$ ./test.sh
1 2
3 4

Any ideas on how I could have it read that last line and echo it?

Thanks in advance.

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I'm not sure what your ultimate goal is, though it might be easier to stick with traditional Unix commands like sed or cut. –  chrisaycock Aug 6 '12 at 2:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can force the input to your loop to end with a newline thus:

#!/bin/bash
(cat test.csv ; echo) | while IFS=',' read -r last first
do
    echo "$last $first"
done

Unfortunately, this may result in an empty line at the end of your output if the input already has a newline at the end. You can fix that with a little addition:

!/bin/bash
(cat test.csv ; echo) | while IFS=',' read -r last first
do
    if [[ $last != "" ]] ; then
        echo "$last $first"
    fi
done

Another method relies on the fact that the values are being placed into the variables by the read but they're just not being output because of the while statement:

#!/bin/bash
while IFS=',' read -r last first
do
    echo "$last $first"
done <test.csv
if [[ $last != "" ]] ; then
    echo "$last $first"
fi

That one works without creating another subshell to modify the input to the while statement.


Of course, I'm assuming here that you want to do more inside the loop that just output the values with a space rather than a comma. If that's all you wanted to do, there are other tools better suited than a bash read loop, such as:

tr "," " " <test.csv
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Thanks a lot, this did the trick! One thing I'm still confused is why the CSV doesn't have a newline at the end of the last line. –  kkSlider Aug 6 '12 at 5:56
    
That would be the responsibility of whatever program generated the file. –  paxdiablo Aug 6 '12 at 6:22
cat file |sed -e '${/^$/!s/$/\n/;}'| while IFS=',' read -r last first; do echo "$last $first"; done
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If the last (unterminated) line needs to be processed differently from the rest, @paxdiablo's version with the extra if statement is the way to go; but if it's going to be handled like all the others, it's cleaner to process it in the main loop.

You can roll the "if there was an unterminated last line" into the main loop condition like this:

while IFS=',' read -r last first || [ -n "$last" ]
do
    echo "$last $first"
done < test.csv
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