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I really apologize because I know that this question has been asked multiple times. I have gone through all of the previous questions, but I still have yet to have any luck setting up the Solarized colorscheme in my Terminal.app for OS X Mountain Lion. So far this is what I have: enter image description here

My .vimrc currently is set up like the following:

set number
syntax enable
set background="dark" 
colorscheme solarized

but for my MacVim I get this:

enter image description here

This is what I would like to have my Terminal.app display as well. The only thing that my .vimrc says for MacVim is

colorscheme solarized

Edit

After I had asked this question, I eventually moved to iTerm2, which proved to be much nicer.

I'm not 100% sure, but I think the newer versions of OS X terminal will support 256 colors out of the box.

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3  
Did you go through the instructions in the osx-terminal.app-colors-solarized directory? It requires more than vimrc changes, you need to mod Terminal.app –  pb2q Aug 6 '12 at 3:15
1  
I was under the impression that terminal.app did not need to be modified, as the terminal now supports the 256 colors in Lion and ML. –  ndland Aug 6 '12 at 12:37
    
What is the response to echo $TERM in your Terminal.app? –  Conner Aug 6 '12 at 15:47
    
It returns ansi –  ndland Aug 6 '12 at 22:10

6 Answers 6

I had the same issue, then I downloaded an alternate implementation of the Solarized theme for the Mountain Lion terminal, and this appears to have solved it.

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Just add let g:solarized_termcolors=256 to your vimrc

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this completely fixed it for me. Why oh why solarized wasn't defaulting to 256 is beyond me. Is it naturally 16 colors? –  EhevuTov Jul 26 '13 at 9:01

Ensure that TERM is set to xterm-256color to let Vim know that the terminal supports 256 colors. This is the default for Terminal in Lion 10.7 and later†, so your preferences were customized at some point.

To tell Terminal to set TERM to a different value, go to

Terminal > Preferences > Settings > [profile] > Advanced

and change Declare terminal as: to xterm-256color.

[Note that all this preference does is set the value of the TERM environment variable. It does not alter the behavior of Terminal or affect what sort of terminal it emulates.]

† Prior to Lion, the default was xterm-color.

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To run vim with 256 colors you must use a 256 color terminal. You can set your terminal to xterm-256color, for example, with export TERM=xterm-256color and then start vim. You can export this $TERM setting in one of your terminal startup scripts (e.g. .bashrc, .zshrc, etc.).

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1  
I have already ensured that terminal has been set to run 256 colors. Unfortunately, I'm still having the same trouble. –  ndland Aug 9 '12 at 12:33
    
See the other answer and make sure you don't have set term anywhere in your vimrc. –  Conner Aug 9 '12 at 14:45

It may seem counterintuitive, but use set g:solarized_termcolors=16. This is confirmed to be the correct setting with :h solarized.

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I tried installing both ANSI and xterm-256color themes for OS X's Terminal and vim's color scheme with partial success.

The ANSI colors were never imported in Terminal.app — which I expected, so I considered 2 options.

  1. Manually set the values clicking on each swatch, then using Color Sliders set to color space sRGB (!) and then entering them in RGB or HSB sliders.

http://ethanschoonover.com/solarized#the-values

SOLARIZED HEX     16/8 TERMCOL  XTERM/HEX   L*A*B      RGB         HSB
--------- ------- ---- -------  ----------- ---------- ----------- -----------
base03    #002b36  8/4 brblack  234 #1c1c1c 15 -12 -12   0  43  54 193 100  21
base02    #073642  0/4 black    235 #262626 20 -12 -12   7  54  66 192  90  26
base01    #586e75 10/7 brgreen  240 #585858 45 -07 -07  88 110 117 194  25  46
base00    #657b83 11/7 bryellow 241 #626262 50 -07 -07 101 123 131 195  23  51
base0     #839496 12/6 brblue   244 #808080 60 -06 -03 131 148 150 186  13  59
base1     #93a1a1 14/4 brcyan   245 #8a8a8a 65 -05 -02 147 161 161 180   9  63
base2     #eee8d5  7/7 white    254 #e4e4e4 92 -00  10 238 232 213  44  11  93
base3     #fdf6e3 15/7 brwhite  230 #ffffd7 97  00  10 253 246 227  44  10  99
yellow    #b58900  3/3 yellow   136 #af8700 60  10  65 181 137   0  45 100  71
orange    #cb4b16  9/3 brred    166 #d75f00 50  50  55 203  75  22  18  89  80
red       #dc322f  1/1 red      160 #d70000 50  65  45 220  50  47   1  79  86
magenta   #d33682  5/5 magenta  125 #af005f 50  65 -05 211  54 130 331  74  83
violet    #6c71c4 13/5 brmagenta 61 #5f5faf 50  15 -45 108 113 196 237  45  77
blue      #268bd2  4/4 blue      33 #0087ff 55 -10 -45  38 139 210 205  82  82
cyan      #2aa198  6/6 cyan      37 #00afaf 60 -35 -05  42 161 152 175  74  63
green     #859900  2/2 green     64 #5f8700 60 -20  65 133 153   0  68 100  60
  1. Install the Solarized Palette and use Color Palettes to set each swatch (see above table for color name mapping).

You can find the minimally customized Solarized themes I exported from Terminal.app after doing 2., here.

Tested successfully on OS X 10.8.5, Terminal 2.3.

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