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one of my classes in Javascript needs to be "updated" with Json sometimes. I have always done a function, that updates the array of data, given an id, but now i wanted to do it more encapsulated (Function update, inside the class).

What i made:

function File(data){
        this.data = data;

        this.update = function (callback){
            var set = function(ajaxData){
                this.data = ajaxData.PcbFile;
            }
            getPcbFile(data.id, function(ajaxData){
                set(ajaxData);
                callback();
            });
        };
    }

But, this.data = ajaxData.PcbFile; doesen't work... My object still with the last data set, and not the updated one. The function SET, i created as another attempt to set the data.

There is no problem on the ajax, since i debuged the ajaxData, and it's ok (when i update).

So, how do i really access the object property data from an inside function?

(sorry for my english...)

share|improve this question
    
The value that "this" is resolved to depends on the way you call the function that contains whatever code makes use of it. Check out the MDN docs for this. –  Alexander Aug 6 '12 at 3:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I learned this the hard way, you have to be careful with this. It always refers to the this in the current scope, not it's containing object. Whenever you wrap something in function() { ... }, this becomes of a different scope. In your case, duplicate the object to a local variable and manipulate it's .data property.

function File(data){
    this.data = data;
    var thing = this; //call the variable whatever you want
    this.update = function (callback){
        var set = function(ajaxData){
            thing.data = ajaxData.PcbFile;
        }
        getPcbFile(data.id, function(ajaxData){
            set(ajaxData);
            callback();
        });
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Worked perfecly! thanks a lot! –  Ivan Seidel Aug 6 '12 at 3:35
    
"It always refers to the current scope" - Except when it doesn't. You can explicitly set this to whatever object you like if you call a function with .apply() or .call(). –  nnnnnn Aug 6 '12 at 3:42
    
@nnnnnn yes, but i've never used that or ever seen it used. it seems like an outlandishly advanced way to solve the problem. –  SomekidwithHTML Aug 6 '12 at 4:29
    
Well I wouldn't use .apply() or .call() for the problem at hand (you can see my answer is essentially the same as yours), but I have used them for other cases. I was just being picky about the language you used - note that this refers to an object, which isn't the same as scope. –  nnnnnn Aug 6 '12 at 4:45

Try this:

function File(data){
    this.data = data;

    var self = this;

    this.update = function (callback){
        var set = function(ajaxData){
            self.data = ajaxData.PcbFile;
        }
        getPcbFile(data.id, function(ajaxData){
            set(ajaxData);
            callback();
        });
    };
}

The value of this within a function depends on how that function is called. E.g., when you use the "dot" notation, someObj.someMethod() then within someMethod() you'd have this set to someObj. You can explicitly set this to some other object using the .apply() or .call() methods. Otherwise if you call a function as with set(ajaxData) then this will be the global object (window).

By keeping a reference to this outside your function (I prefer the variable name self for this purpose) you can reference it inside your function.

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Cache this so you can refer to it in the same context some place else:

function File(data){

  var self = this;

  self.data = data;

  self.update = function (callback){
    var set = function(ajaxData){
      self.data = ajaxData.PcbFile;
    }
    getPcbFile(data.id, function(ajaxData){
      set(ajaxData);
      callback();
    });
  };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. Nice to see somebody else using self to reflect that the variable actually is a reference to self, instead of the common but (in my opinion) horrible that, which always sounds like it should refer to some other object. Or, with apologies to SomekidwithHTML, thing, which doesn't really mean anything at all... –  nnnnnn Aug 6 '12 at 3:45
    
I mainly use self because it gets highlighted as keyword in most editors, much easier to track but I agree that that is more common but less semantic. –  elclanrs Aug 6 '12 at 3:48
    
@nnnnnn i don't think it really matters; you'd only have to keep track of the variable in the scope you are using it in. However, self is definitely better than thing, i agree. –  SomekidwithHTML Aug 6 '12 at 4:32

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