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I want to write a ruby program that steps over space in an arbitraty number of dimensions.

In 3 dimensions what I'm doing looks like this:

x_range = (-1..1)
y_range = (-1..1)
z_range = (-1..1)

step_size = 0.01

x_range.step(step_size) do |x|
  y_range.step(step_size) do |y|
    z_range.step(step_size) do |z|

      # do something with the point x,y,z

    end  
  end
end

I want to do the same for n dimensions

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Recursion could solve this kind of problem easily and perfectly. Code below fits any number of dimensions, and also various length of ranges.

def traversal(ranges, step_size, conjunction = [], &blk)
  ranges[0].step(step_size) do |x|
    conjunction.push(x)
    if ranges.size > 1
      traversal(ranges[1..-1], step_size, conjunction, &blk)
    else
      blk.call(conjunction) if block_given?
      conjunction.pop
    end
  end
  conjunction.pop
end

Run: (dimension = 4, length = 3, 3, 4, 2)

x = (1..3)
y = (4..6)
z = (7..10)
w = (100..101)
test_data = [x, y, z, w]
step_size = 1

traversal(test_data, step_size) do |x|
  puts "Point: #{x.join('-')}"
end

Output: (72 points in total, which is 3 * 3 * 4 * 2)

Point: 1-4-7-100
Point: 1-4-7-101
Point: 1-4-8-100
Point: 1-4-8-101
Point: 1-4-9-100
Point: 1-4-9-101
Point: 1-4-10-100
Point: 1-4-10-101
Point: 1-5-7-100
Point: 1-5-7-101
Point: 1-5-8-100
Point: 1-5-8-101
Point: 1-5-9-100
Point: 1-5-9-101
Point: 1-5-10-100
Point: 1-5-10-101
Point: 1-6-7-100
Point: 1-6-7-101
Point: 1-6-8-100
Point: 1-6-8-101
Point: 1-6-9-100
Point: 1-6-9-101
Point: 1-6-10-100
Point: 1-6-10-101
Point: 2-4-7-100
Point: 2-4-7-101
Point: 2-4-8-100
Point: 2-4-8-101
Point: 2-4-9-100
Point: 2-4-9-101
Point: 2-4-10-100
Point: 2-4-10-101
Point: 2-5-7-100
Point: 2-5-7-101
Point: 2-5-8-100
Point: 2-5-8-101
Point: 2-5-9-100
Point: 2-5-9-101
Point: 2-5-10-100
Point: 2-5-10-101
Point: 2-6-7-100
Point: 2-6-7-101
Point: 2-6-8-100
Point: 2-6-8-101
Point: 2-6-9-100
Point: 2-6-9-101
Point: 2-6-10-100
Point: 2-6-10-101
Point: 3-4-7-100
Point: 3-4-7-101
Point: 3-4-8-100
Point: 3-4-8-101
Point: 3-4-9-100
Point: 3-4-9-101
Point: 3-4-10-100
Point: 3-4-10-101
Point: 3-5-7-100
Point: 3-5-7-101
Point: 3-5-8-100
Point: 3-5-8-101
Point: 3-5-9-100
Point: 3-5-9-101
Point: 3-5-10-100
Point: 3-5-10-101
Point: 3-6-7-100
Point: 3-6-7-101
Point: 3-6-8-100
Point: 3-6-8-101
Point: 3-6-9-100
Point: 3-6-9-101
Point: 3-6-10-100
Point: 3-6-10-101
share|improve this answer

This is the first thing that comes to mind for me:

def enumerate(nDimens, bottom, top, step_size)
  bottom = (bottom / step_size).to_i
  top    = (top    / step_size).to_i

  range = (bottom..top).to_a.map{ |x| x * step_size }
  return range.repeated_permutation(nDimens)
end

stepper = enumerate(4, -1, 1, 0.1)

loop do
  puts "#{stepper.next()}"
end

This produces:

[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -1.0]
[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -0.9]
[-1.0, -1.0, -1.0, -0.8]
# Lots more...
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.8]
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.9]
[1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0]

This assumes all dimensions have the same range, but it'd be easy to adjust if for some reason that doesn't hold.

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If ranges are not too big you can do something like this:

n = 5 # 5 dimentions
x = (-1..1).to_a
x.product(*[x]*(n-1)).each {|i| p i}

Result:

[-1, -1, -1, -1, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, -1, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, -1, 1]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, 0, 1]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, -1]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, 0]
[-1, -1, -1, 1, 1]
[-1, -1, 0, -1, -1]
[-1, -1, 0, -1, 0]
# skipped
share|improve this answer

This is what you could do... here is an example iterator.

#next(l[dim] array of lower ranges ,h[dim] = upper ranges, step[dim], dim = dimensions -1, curr[dim] = current state in dim dimensions )
def nextx(l ,h, step, dim, curr)
    x = dim
    update= false
    while (update==false)
        if curr[x] == h[x]
            if x > 0
                x = x-1
            else
                exit
            end

        else
            curr[x]= curr[x]+step[x]
            while (x < dim)
                x = x+1
                curr[x] = l[x]  
            end
            update = true
        end
    end
    return curr
end


l = [0,0,0]
h = [3,3,3]
step = [1,1,1]
currx = [0,0,2]

i = 0
while i < 70
    currx = nextx(l, h, step, 2, currx)
    puts currx.inspect
    i=i+1
end
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