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In the course of updating some legacy Perl code I came across a situation where a C-style for loop terminates prematurely.

The Problem

The situation can be recreated as follows (same result for me on Linux and Windows):

$ perl
for($i = 0.8; $i <= 2.5; $i+=0.1){
    print $i, "\n";
}
__END__
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4

The 2.5 is noticeably absent; it should've passed the $i <= 2.5 conditional.


The Fix

Realizing this may be due to floating-point representations, as outlined in perldoc perlfaq4, I updated the conditional:

$ perl
for($i = 0.8; sprintf( '%.1f', $i ) <= 2.5; $i += 0.1 ) {
    print $i, "\n";
}
__END__
0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5      <--- Gotcha !

And service was resumed (or so I thought).


The Verification

I wanted to prove that the final $i was indeed greater than 2.5, so I wrapped the increment in a do loop:

$ perl
for($i = 0.8;  $i <= 2.5; do { $i += 0.1; print $i, "\n"; } ) {}
__END__
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5      <--- Surprise!

The test results seem to indicate that floating-point representation is not the issue here.

What is going on here?

share|improve this question
    
Silly question: What is the "END" all about? Any chance your "missing 2.5" simply might not be printing (perhaps because you terminated the program before it had a chance to print the last bit of buffered I/O)? –  paulsm4 Aug 6 '12 at 5:58
    
@paulsm4 : __END__ is a flag that indicates the end of an ad-hoc Perl script. –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're suprised that a value greater than 2.5 printed as 2.5? Stop being surprised, that's normal floating point stuff. A plain print doesn't show all the digits. Try this:

printf "%.66g\n", $i

in place of your print statement. On my machine the final value printed is 2.5000000000000013. Yours will probably be similar.

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, that's what I get as well! So the reason was right, but the test was misleading. –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:19

Maybe it is because of float, it is not just as 2.5, you can use it as follows:

for ($i = 0.8; $i < 2.6; $i += 0.1) {

or you can see:

for ($i = 0.8; $i <= 2.5; $i += 0.1) {
    print $i, "\n";
}
print $i, "\n";
print $i <= 2.5 ? 'TRUE' : 'FALSE';

output:

0.8
0.9
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
1.9
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
FALSE
share|improve this answer
    
But this doesn't answer why $i <= 2.5 doesn't work. –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:12
    
Because of floating point, use abs($i-2.5) < 0.0001 –  Bill Ruppert Aug 6 '12 at 6:18

Computer use a binary storage, not a decimal! If you store the decimal number 0.1 as a binary floating point number, it will result in an infinte number ob binary digits:

dezimal 0.1 = binary 0.000110011001100110011001100110011...

So if you don't use integers, you will get rounding-errors. The dezimal value 0.1 might be stored as the digital number 0.0001100110011001101 and this is dezimal 0.100006104

Adding 25 times 0.100006104 gives 2.50015259 and this is more than 2.5, so this last value is out of range.

share|improve this answer

The value of i is being increased at different times. Notice your first value in the last run is 0.9, not 0.8.

The problem with the first one is floating point, try using 2.5001 in the condition. Try it using integers, 8 to 25 by 1, the <= works fine.

for($i = 8; $i <= 25; $i += 1 ) {
    print $i/10, "\n";
}

Or

  print $_/10, "\n" for 8..25;

or

my $epsilon = .00000001;

for(my $i = 0.8; ($i - 2.5) <= $epsilon; $i += .1 ) {
    print $i, $/;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first value in the last run is 0.9 because it's printing after the $i += 0.1 increment. In the other examples it is printing before it. –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:02
    
So the same number of iterations is occurring. –  Bill Ruppert Aug 6 '12 at 6:07
    
Same number of iterations, but the final $i is 2.5, not 2.500001 –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:08
2  
Try using integers and divide by 10 for the answer, first one works fine. –  Bill Ruppert Aug 6 '12 at 6:09
    
I'd prefer to avoid that workaround if possible. Can you recreate the same issue? –  Zaid Aug 6 '12 at 6:10

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