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in this article What's all this fuss about Erlang? it is said that:

" The world IS concurrent. It IS parallel. Things happen all over the place at the same time. I could not drive my car on the highway if I did not intuitively understand the notion of concurrency; pure message-passing concurrency is what we do all the time."

i dont get it i dont think this is correct when i drive my car into a gas station i wait for the person before me to finish filling his gas tank as he is using (locking) the gas stand anyone thinks what im saying is incorrect?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Roberto Aloi, Nathaniel Waisbrot, SergeS, Abbas, Praveen Mar 3 at 8:23

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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The article never says "The world does not need locks." The article says, "In Erlang, given that there is no shared state, Erlang programs have no need for locks." Locks are one way of achieving concurrency by sharing mutable state. Erlang achieves concurrency by passing messages instead of sharing state.

A gas stand is just a place to get gas. How people decide to make sure only one person is using it at a time is a separate matter. In a shared state language, you might have one gas stand instance that you lock when you want to use it. In a message passing language, you could send a message to the gas stand process "Is someone using you?" and the gas stand will reply yes or no. You can achieve the same basic goal either way.

You might be wondering, "That sounds like a lock to me!" The important distinction is, there is exactly one process responsible for each piece of state in Erlang, but any number of threads can influence on piece of state with mutable locked data. If the gas stand state gets corrupted with locking semantics, you don't know what thread broke it. In Erlang, you can see every message that comes into the process responsible for that data, and see what messages are damaging it. It might sound like a useless distinction, but believe me, it makes concurrency much easier to deal with.

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Thank i feel this is.much.closer.to.what i was trying to understand can you just clarify.this " The important distinction is, there is exactly one process responsible for each piece of state in Erlang, but any number of threads can influence on piece of state with mutable locked data. If t The important distinction is, there is exactly one process responsible for each piece of state in Erlang, but any number of threads can influence on piece of state with mutable locked data." –  Jas Aug 6 '12 at 11:41
    
I'm trying to think of a good example. I'll see if I can post it tomorrow. –  kjw0188 Aug 7 '12 at 9:53
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The simplest answer is that it's just an analogy. That particular paragraph is really about why concurrency matters, and why it's not as unintuitive as one might at first think, coming from a procedural programming world (see? I said 'world', but I really meant something like 'background' or 'context' it's easy to mix metaphors).

Anyway, I wouldn't read too far into that statement, I don't think it's meant to imply (nor does it explicitly say) that the world itself is lockless, just that the world is concurrent. That's where the analogy starts to veer left; just like you and I do not share state (which is mentioned), we also are not immutable. You can change your opinion, change your shirt, etc. without forking and creating a new entity with a new shirt. As mentioned elsewhere in the article, Erlang gets around some problems inherent in maintaining concurrent state by making everything immutable. We solve things by politely waiting for the guy in front of us at the gas station.

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"We solve things by politely waiting for the guy in front of us at the gas station." - if you wait isn't that a lock? I thought no locks in erlang... –  Jas Aug 6 '12 at 6:22
    
Jason, then you are wrong. receive is a kind of lock since it blocks until you get a message. If you send a message to a process and then do a receive to wait for an answer you have effectivley implemented a mutex lock. –  Emil Vikström Aug 6 '12 at 6:50
    
Emil, can i do without any kind of a 'lock' while waiting for the gas stand to be empty? i want to understand the concept from the article it looks like the claim was that locks are not needed, i want to understand if that is true, i'm using the gas stand as a real world example to see that i don't need to lock a shared resource. the claim was that if i 'program' my life with erlang the world is immutable and i don't need any locks, how can that be applied to the gas stand example please? –  Jas Aug 6 '12 at 9:55
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Gases etc are fluids only if you don't examine them too closely. You need a large sample if you want to describe things with continuous functions. If you look too closely the fluid approximation breaks down. Going the other way, if you zoom out far enough, you can treat (eg) grain as a fluid.

The fact that these things are in fact made up of indivisible units with quantised, deterministic behaviour does not stop fluid dynamics equations from decribing them accurately on a macro level.

Are they fluids, or not? The answer is "Yes, they are fluids. Or not, depending."

There are conditions under which a model applies, and other conditions under which it does not. Failure to apprehend this leads to belief in silver bullets, and dashed hopes.

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