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In embedded systems, still the trend has not shifted to multi-core processors completely for various valid reasons.

Hence it is still important to understand synchronization behaviour using various mechanisms and multi threading features with respect to uni processor systems. Also, whenever I face interviews, they ask me questions on the behavior of a particular C program on uni processor system.

So, if I want to analyze the Sample C programs on a uni processor systems, to check the behaviour of them at home, how would I do that? My CPU at home has a Core i3 processor. Is there a way I can ask my OS or compiler to check the behaviour forcebly by considering only one CPU?

Example:

int x=0;

Snippet-1

    while(x);
    x++;

Snippet-2

    while(!x);
    x--;

Considering a uni processor system, I want to check the behaviour of a C program in which

  • Snippet 1 and snippet 2 are in multiple threads
  • Snippet 1 is in the main program and snippet 2 is in ISR
  • Snippet1 and Snippet2 are both in two different ISRs (Consider interrupts are caught on priority, and also when inside ISR, if there is a new interrupt coming with higher priority, then the interrupt with highest priority is executed immediately - Ex: Reset)

In the above questions, my primary goal is to identify if there will be any dead locks, and if present, need to identify the solution. Please put in your thoughts. Thanks.

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You can try playing with affinity, which allows to bind a process/thread to a specific CPU (or a set of CPUs). – Maksim Skurydzin Aug 6 '12 at 7:16
3  
I would say you should really rethink this. Proving deadlocks (or a lack there of) empirically will give you false answers - especially for code that is inherently thread un-safe. – nos Aug 6 '12 at 7:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I suggest you to create a uni-processor system by compiling new kernel with only one core enabled in i3.(Obviously performance will be less.)

Follow the steps in following link,

http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/compiling-linux-kernel-26.html

While configuring,

go to Processor type and Features-->

Un-check the Symmetric Multiprocessing Support.

and study the instruction to create uni processor system.

enter image description here

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You can simply boot your linux with 'maxcpus' kernel parameter set according to your needs. It specifies the maximum number of processors that an SMP Linux kernel should make use of. For instance maxcpus=1.

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Uniprocessor and multiprocessor systems differ only in those areas where your program is already invalid ("causes undefined behaviour" according to the standard).

Your example program modifies a shared variable from an ISR without using the volatile modifier and without guarding against concurrent execution of other ISRs.

The former has the effect that the compiler may optimize the code assuming that x cannot change:

while(x);
x++;

would be expected to compile to assembler instructions that perform the following steps:

loop:
    read x into register0
    test register0 != 0
    if true => goto loop
    increment register0
    write register0 to x

During optimization, the compiler sees that x is not volatile, and moves the memory access outside the loop:

    read x into register0
loop:
    test register0 != 0
    if true => goto loop
    increment register0
    write register0 to x

Subsequently, it sees that register0 is never modified during loop execution, so the test can be moved outside of the loop as well:

    read x into register0
    test register0 != 0
loop:
    if true => goto loop
    increment register0
    write register0 to x

Some compilers then go the extra step and invert the test to be able to use a cheaper instruction inside the loop

    read x into register0
    test register0 != 0
    if false => goto skip
loop:
    goto loop
skip:
    increment register0
    write register0 to x

Obviously, this is not quite what you want.

The other issue is that ISRs may or may not interrupt each other due to IRQ priority levels, and that in a multiprocessor system, multiple ISRs may be running simultaneously on different processors.

Assuming the code properly uses volatile, you can verify the behaviour in theory by assuming that higher-priority interrupts and task scheduling can happen between any two instructions; assembler pseudo-code for your snippets is

    push register0
loop:
    load x into register0
    test register0 != 0
    if true => goto loop
    write 1 to x            // can you see what I did there?
    pop register0

and

    push register0
loop:
    load x into register0
    test register0 == 0
    if true => goto loop
    decrement register0
    write register0 to x
    pop register0

A possible constellation would be

CPU1    push register0
CPU2    push register0
CPU1    load x into register0 [value = 0]
CPU2    load x into register0 [value = 0]
CPU1    test register0 != 0 [false]
CPU2    test register0 == 0 [true]
CPU1    if true => goto loop [not taken]
CPU2    if true => goto loop [taken]
CPU1    increment register0 [value = 1]
CPU2    read x into register0 [value = 0]
CPU1    write register0 to x [value = 1]
CPU2    test register0 == 0 [true]
CPU1    pop register0
CPU2    if true => goto loop [taken]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    read x into register0 [value = 1]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    test register0 == 0 [false]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    if true => goto loop [not taken]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    decrement register0 [value = 0]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    write register0 to x [value = 0]
CPU1    ...
CPU2    pop register0

The usual way to solve this theoretically is to identify ranges of instructions where certain assumptions are being held, and then look for ways how these assumptions may be wrong in the face of concurrent execution:

    // precondition: address at stack pointer is unused
    // precondition: decrementing the stack pointer will not bring us to a used address
    push register0
    // postcondition: address at stack pointer is unused
    // postcondition: register0 is unused

In order for these conditions to be fulfilled, the system-wide convention is that all memory below the current stack pointer is unused. This way, an ISR can always assume that pushing data to the stack is allowed. Note that writing the data and decrementing the stack pointer is an atomic operation. If another interrupt arrives here, its data will also be pushed on the stack, but uses a different address.

loop:
    // precondition: register0 is unused
    read x into register0
    // begin assumption: register0 contains a copy of x

I think you can see where this is going. If we are interrupted from here on, and the value of x changes, this assumption is going to be wrong.

    test register0 != 0
    // postcondition: processor status contains result of (register0 != 0)

    if true => goto loop
    // postcondition[true]: register0 != 0
    // postcondition[false]: register0 == 0

This is where we have proven that the only way to exit the loop is when register0 == 0. Thus:

    increment register0
    write register0 to x
    // end assumption: register0 contains a copy of x

can be augmented to

    // precondition: register0 is 0
    increment register0
    // postcondition: register0 is 1

    // precondition: register0 is 1
    write register0 to x
    // end assumption: register0 contains a copy of x

which can then be simplified to

    // precondition: register0 is 0
    // modified assumption: register0 contains a copy of x, minus one
    // due to precondition, x needs to be written as 1
    write 1 to x
    // end assumption: register0 contains a copy of x, minus one

The last instruction does not use register0, so the "end assumption" statement can be moved upwards, before the now-eliminated increment operation:

    // end assumption: register0 contains a copy of x
    // precondition: register0 is 0
    write 1 to x

The precondition is easily proven from the loop

    // precondition: stack pointer points at address below where we placed the saved copy
    // precondition: memory below the stack pointer is unused
    pop register0
    // postcondition: stack pointer points at unused memory
    // postcondition: stack pointer points at the same address as before the push
    // postcondition: register0 is restored

Thus, you need to handle the case where the assumption is violated, which is any case where the value of x is modified between the time we read it, and the time the new value is written back, and the case where your condition is never fulfilled because the code that could make it cannot be called.

Both cases can happen on uniprocessor and multiprocessor designs; the difference is that multiprocessor has an additional failure mode which hides some errors.

The failure modes for uniprocessor are

  • ISR1 reads
  • ISR2 reads (ISR2 has higher priority)
  • ISR2 writes
  • ISR1 writes

and

  • ISR2 goes into busy loop, waiting for condition to change
  • ISR1 is blocked as ISR2 (higher priority) is active

Case 1 is equivalent to

  • mainloop reads
  • ISR reads
  • ISR writes
  • mainloop writes

and

  • thread 1 reads
  • thread 2 reads
  • thread 2 writes
  • thread 1 writes

Case 2 is equivalent to

  • ISR goes into busy loop, waiting for condition to change
  • mainloop is blocked, as ISR is active

There is no deadlock in the multithreaded case, because threads do not block each other.

For multiprocessor (and the multithreaded case, instead of the deadlock), there is an additional failure mode:

  • ISR1 reads
  • ISR2 reads
  • ISR1 writes
  • ISR2 writes

which does not happen with the mainloop (because the IRQ always has priority and blocks out the mainloop), but does happen with multiple threads:

  • thread 1 reads
  • thread 2 reads
  • thread 1 writes
  • thread 2 writes

The solution, for all of these cases, is to either make sure that everyone else is locked out during the critical section where the assumption that register0 contains a copy of x needs to hold, or that the error is detected after the fact, and handled appropriately.

Both of these are in fact equivalent -- you need an atomic instruction that will both give you the current state of a variable and write the new state in one go (or alternatively, write the new state under the condition that the old state is still intact). You can then either use a separate variable that represents whether someone is inside the critical section, or use this special instruction on the variable x directly.

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This is easy to do in Windows. In the Windows Task Manager, click the Processes tab. In the process list, find your program, right click, and on the drop-down menu, click "Set Affinity...". This brings up a dialog where you can set which processors can be used to run a process. Uncheck all processors except for one, and your program will run on only that one processor. Unfortunately, you have to do this every time you start the program.

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