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I have a strongly-typed dataset that is using DBDirectMethods to insert data into a database using calls to stored procedures. The stored procedures return the primary key of the newly-created record. Here's a sample stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.CreateUser
(
    @UserName   VARCHAR(50)
    @Password   VARCHAR(50)
)
AS

SET NOCOUNT OFF

DECLARE @UserID INT

BEGIN TRANSACTION

INSERT INTO dbo.Users (UserName, Password) VALUES (@UserName, @Password)

SET @UserID = SCOPE_IDENTITY()

INSERT INTO dbo.Users_History (UserID, Status, TimeStamp) VALUES (@UserID, 'C', GETUTCDATE())

COMMIT TRANSACTION

RETURN @UserID

GO

If I execute the stored procedure from SSMS, then the user account is created, the history table updated, and the primary key returned. If I run my application using the strongly-typed dataset and have SQL Profiler ticking away, I can see the same code being executed; however, the dataset returns -1 as the primary key and breaks the app.

Inside the VS-generated code for the table adapter, the relevant lines are:

this._adapter.InsertCommand.CommandText = "dbo.CreateUser";
this._adapter.InsertCommand.CommandType = global::System.Data.CommandType.StoredProcedure;
this._adapter.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add(new global::System.Data.SqlClient.SqlParameter("@RETURN_VALUE", global::System.Data.SqlDbType.Int, 4, global::System.Data.ParameterDirection.ReturnValue, 10, 0, null, global::System.Data.DataRowVersion.Current, false, null, "", "", ""));
this._adapter.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add(new global::System.Data.SqlClient.SqlParameter("@UserName", global::System.Data.SqlDbType.VarChar, 50, global::System.Data.ParameterDirection.Input, 0, 0, "UserName", global::System.Data.DataRowVersion.Current, false, null, "", "", ""));
this._adapter.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add(new global::System.Data.SqlClient.SqlParameter("@Password", global::System.Data.SqlDbType.VarChar, 50, global::System.Data.ParameterDirection.Input, 0, 0, "Password", global::System.Data.DataRowVersion.Current, false, null, "", "", ""));

and

try {
    int returnValue = this.Adapter.InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
    return returnValue;
}
finally {
    if ((previousConnectionState == global::System.Data.ConnectionState.Closed)) {
        this.Adapter.InsertCommand.Connection.Close();
    }
}

which is all just the standard boiler-plate code that VS usually generates - nothing has been edited by hand. It just doesn't pick up the return value.

I am running Windows 7 with SQL 2008 R2 SP1 Express.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From memory, the issue here is that the value ExecuteNonQuery() returns is the number of rows affected by the query.

Instead, your return value should be accessible via:

InsertCommand.Parameters["@RETURN_VALUE"].Value;

or

InsertCommand.Parameters[0].Value;

In addition, you can try changing your return parameter name to @UserID rather than @RETURN_VALUE but it should still work as you have it.

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The setting up of the return value is taken care of by the generated code, and if I remove the SET NOCOUNT ON from my stored procedure, that value correctly loads the number of affected rows (i.e. 2); but if I try to return any other value, then it fails. I've worked out a solution though (see below). –  David Keaveny Aug 7 '12 at 0:14
    
The return value is in the parameter - this is a weakness of the autogenerated code - it doesn't really care about output and return parameters. Your solution is probably the best one if you want to rely on the autogenerated code alone. –  dash Aug 7 '12 at 8:04
    
ExecuteScalar does seem to be the way to go. –  David Keaveny Jan 6 '13 at 22:34

It seems that rather than returning only the PK, I need to return the entire new record. By changing my stored procedure to the following:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.CreateUser
(
    @UserName   VARCHAR(50)
    @Password   VARCHAR(50)
)
AS

SET NOCOUNT OFF

DECLARE @UserID INT

BEGIN TRANSACTION

INSERT INTO dbo.Users (UserName, Password) VALUES (@UserName, @Password)

SET @UserID = SCOPE_IDENTITY()

INSERT INTO dbo.Users_History (UserID, Status, TimeStamp) VALUES (@UserID, 'C', GETUTCDATE())

COMMIT TRANSACTION

SELECT UserID, UserName, Password FROM dbo.Users WHERE UserID = @UserID

GO

then ADO.NET automatically loads the returned result into the dataset, and I can get UserID from there.

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1  
Note you could also do SELECT UserID, then, instead of ExecuteNonQuery, you can do ExecuteScalar and cast the result to an Int32. - e.g. int userId = Convert.ToInt32(Adapter.InsertCommand.ExecuteScalar()); –  dash Aug 7 '12 at 8:06

You need to change the query type from ExecuteNonQuery to ExecuteScalar See http://blogs.msdn.com/b/smartclientdata/archive/2005/10/31/returnidentityvaluequery.aspx

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