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The question is from c++ faq.

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/protected-virtuals.html

Code using public overloaded virtuals:

class Base {
public:
  virtual void f(int x);    ← may or may not be pure virtual
  virtual void f(double x); ← may or may not be pure virtual
};

Improving this via the Public Overloaded Non-Virtuals Call Protected Non-Overloaded Virtuals idiom:

class Base {
public:
  void f(int x)    { f_int(x); }  ← non-virtual
  void f(double x) { f_dbl(x); }  ← non-virtual
protected:
  virtual void f_int(int);
  virtual void f_dbl(double);
};

The author said, 'The idea of the Public Overloaded Non-Virtuals Call Protected Non-Overloaded Virtuals idiom is to change the public overloaded methods to non-virtuals, and make those call protected non-overloaded virtuals.'

But i do not understand what the author said on how this idiom improve risk:

' the idiom packs the complexity of properly managing the hiding rule into the base class (singular). This means the derived classes (plural) more-or-less automatically handle the hiding rule, so the various developers who produce those derived classes can remain almost completely focused on the details of the derived classes themselves — they need not concern themselves with the (subtle and often misunderstood) hiding rule. This greatly reduces the chance that the writers of the derived classes will screw up the hiding-rule. '

Why does this solve the hiding problem? From what i understand, name hiding has nothing to do whether the member function is 'virtual' or not. If a derived class of 'base' rewrites a function f(), it will still hide the f(int) and f(double), right?

From this idiom all i can see is that author change the 'base' virtual f() to non virtual, and put helper functions f_int(), f_dbl() in 'protected virtual', like the name of idiom said. It does nothing good yet but in contrary eliminates possibility of dynamic binding from base class pointer/reference. What is the true benefit of this idiom?

Any one could help? Thanks.

Hi, Kerrek

Are you saying this? I do not fully understand the 2nd paragraph of your answer. Could you give an example?

class base {
public: 
    virtual void f(int x);
    virtual void f(double x);
}

class derived : public base {
public:
    virtual int f(int x); // oops, will hide base::f(int x) AND base::f(double x)
}

base *bp = new base();
base *dp = new derived();
bp->f(int i);    // ok
dp->f(int i);    // surprise!
dp->f(double d); // compile error!


class Base {
public:
    void f(int x)    { f_int(x); }  
    void f(double x) { f_dbl(x); } 
protected:
    virtual void f_int(int);
    virtual void f_dbl(double);
};

class derived : public base {
public:
    // nothing to override here 'cause f() is non virtual
protected:
    // because f_int() and f_dbl are unique names, override or hide f_int() will not affect f_dbl()?
    virtual int f_int(int);  // oops, will hide base::f(int x), but developer may want this on purpose
                             // no effect on f_dbl(), which is good
}

base bobj;
derived dobj;
bobj.f(int i);    // ok
dobj.f(double d); // ok
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If a derived class declares void f(int), then it overrides the virtual function, and the virtual specifier is implied. If a derived class declares int f(int), it hides the base function. I gather that you're familiar with this.

The problem comes when you want others to develop code based on your base class. With the naive approach, each derived class must be careful to add the correct override so as not to accidentally hide the function and get a working, but wrong program (i.e. the user says f() but gets the wrong thing). With the "public non-virtual" idiom, the user always calls f() in confidence, and the library developer can override only those parts that she's interested in by overriding a uniquely named, protected function, without having to touch a name that may affect other users.

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There is also another reason for the non-virtual public functions, namely that they can centralize checking of pre- and post-conditions, logging, and other general stuff. However, I do not find these reasons compelling. There is a trade-off, namely the complexity of having these different functions, and any problem with overload resolution is likely to and should surface via testing -- possibly the programmer's own quick checking of the functionality. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 6 '12 at 9:01
    
On a slightly different note, the FAQ's advice to have virtuals protected instead of private made good sense for C++03, because to the extent that you could assert that a function was an override, it required the base class' declaration to be accessible in the derived class. However, with C++11 we finally have a standard override specification. And it works also for private virtuals. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 6 '12 at 9:04
    
@Alf It also depends on where you learned programming by contract. The reference here is Bertrand Meyer and the Eiffel programming language. And in those, a function in a derived class could call a function in the base class without pre- and post-condition checking. (IMHO, if a base class function provides part of the implementation, it should have a different name from the virtual function, and I've always made my virtual functions private.) –  James Kanze Aug 6 '12 at 9:24
    
Kerrek, what do you mean 'With the "public non-virtual" idiom, the user always calls f() in confidence, '? 'in confidence' meaning in secret? i still can not see it. An example? –  user1559625 Aug 6 '12 at 10:42
    
@user1559625: I mean that you always know precisely which function gets called, independent on what sort of static or dynamic type your object or reference has. Since there's no possibility of accidental hiding, the call always goes to Base::f. –  Kerrek SB Aug 6 '12 at 11:00
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All i can see is that it would reduce the likeliness that you're linking to SomeDerived::f() rather than using the virtual Base::f(), although I don't remember I've caught a compiler guilty of this so far. Looking for someone else to propose a better answer ...

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The main motivation, historically at least, for using non-public virtual functions has been to support programming by contract. The (non-virtual) public functions in Base define a contract, with assert (or something similar) of pre- and post-conditions and invariants. They forward to private or protected virtual functions for the actual work. Thus, for example, the classical clone function might be defined:

class Base
{
    virtual Base* doClone() const = 0;
public:
    Base* clone() const
    {
        Base* results = doClone();
        assert( typeid(*this) == typeid( *results ) );
        return results;
    }
};

In the case of clone, this sort of protection is probably overkill; I've yet to see any problems due to a derived class misimplementing it (or failing to implement it, if there are multiple levels of derivation). For most other functions, however, it's a powerful and effective means of developing robust software.

If you have overloaded functions in the interface, and they have different implementations, I don't see any real reason not to overload the virtual functions.

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