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Sorry, just learning Java; but, can someone tell me why I'm getting a "cannot find symbol" error? My code is as follows:

public class NumberHolder {
  public int anInt;
  public float aFloat;

  public NumberHolder(int setAnInt, float setAFloat) {
    setAnInt = anInt;
    setAFloat = aFloat;
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    NumberHolder newNumber = NumberHolder(12, 24F);
  }
}
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Where do you get this error? –  user647772 Aug 6 '12 at 9:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like you're missing a new before the call to the constructor:

NumberHolder newNumber = new NumberHolder(12, 24F);

EDIT: Also, as Tassos Bassoukos points out in his answer, you need to turn around the assignments in the constructor:

anInt = setAnInt;
aFloat = setAFloat;

Although personally, I like to write my constructors like this:

public NumberHolder(int anInt, float aFloat) {
  this.anInt = anInt;
  this.aFloat = aFloat;
}

This is a matter of style and personal preference, though.

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Duh. Thinking maybe I should sleep and try this tomorrow. Thanks. –  Tayler Mulligan Aug 6 '12 at 9:49
    
That's how I wrote it, but it was saying self assignment, and I changed it. –  Tayler Mulligan Aug 6 '12 at 9:59
    
It's important to know that this.anInt refers to the field, but anInt refers to the parameter. So, the first one needs a this. in front of it, but the second one cannot have one, or else it won't work. –  jqno Aug 6 '12 at 10:00
    
Sorry, but I don't entirely understand this. this.anInt refers to the field which is contained in the class, whereas anInt only refers to the parameter in your block? –  Tayler Mulligan Aug 6 '12 at 10:14
    
Exactly :). The parameters "shadow" the fields with the same name, but by writing this. in front of them, you force the compiler to look at the containing class instead of the parameters. –  jqno Aug 6 '12 at 10:45

Since

public NumberHolder(int anInt, float aFloat);

is a constructor and not an ordenary method, you need to use the keyword new in order to obtain the actual object. You are calling it like a method and you don't have any method named NumberHolder (but it would be valid if you'd have)

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Beyond the new keyword that you're missing, the assignment in the constructor should be the other way around.

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You need to instanciate new objects with the new keyword.

public class NumberHolder {
    public int anInt;
    public float aFloat;

    public NumberHolder(int anInt, float aFloat) {
        this.anInt = anInt;
        this.aFloat = aFloat;

    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        NumberHolder newNumber = new NumberHolder(12, 24F);
    }

}
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