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I have two divs in my website,one is left side and other is right side. But client said don't use float:right.So i used margin:left What is the plus point of not using float:right? margin-left or float:right, or am I wrong? Please help me.

#left
{
float:left;
width:200px;
}
#right
{
float:right;
width:200px;
}

or

#left
    {
    float:left;
    width:200px;
    }
    #right
    {
    margin-left:250px;
    width:200px;
    }
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1  
Interesting. I always use right floats rather than lefts with a set gap. Very interested to see if there is a good reason though I'm curious as to why a) a client would say that and b) you would listen to them. –  SpaceBeers Aug 6 '12 at 9:47
4  
Any advice that says "don't use feature X" regardless of context and where feature X is considered valid, is wrong. There's a time and a place for all valid features in HTML and CSS. –  Alohci Aug 6 '12 at 9:47
    
Your client tells your what CSS property not to use? That's a first! –  Moin Zaman Aug 6 '12 at 9:48
    
I think I vote for float:right :) it helps you when you resize the window. Like Zaman says.. I never heard a client telling me what should I use.. –  Matei Mihai Aug 6 '12 at 9:53
1  
There is no problem with using float:right. –  sandeep Aug 6 '12 at 10:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I imagine it is to do with the order of the markup. In principle, you should write all your markup first, so it makes sense without any css, and then add css rules afterwards.

If you need to move your markup around to satisfy the css conditions, you might be damaging the search-engine-optimisation, accessibility, or readability and clear structure of your code.

If you float something right, sometimes you need to put the element first in the markup, even though it appears visually second.

This is of course speculation, and as Marcus Aurelius wrote about in his book meditations - it is more or less a waste of time trying to understand another person (in this case your client) as you can never truly succeed, only fool yourself into thinking you fully understand them and their motivations. Instead, you should concern yourself with making sure your own motivations, and actions are correct - so make sure you know when and when not ot float things left or right (which you are on the path to doing now), and reveal these truths to your client.

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1  
what is this Marcus Aurelius –  Rohit Azad Aug 6 '12 at 10:06
    
Thank you, i will use float:right –  prash Aug 6 '12 at 10:08
2  
@Rohit: I don't think the question is only about computers and mathematics. I think the question is also about the behavior of people. Why has a client got a strong (and probably over simplified to the point of being wrong) opinion on floats at all, and how do you handle the client's whimsical opinions effectively? These are questions for the philosophers, like good old Marcus. –  Billy Moon Aug 6 '12 at 10:12
    
Last paragraph is the most Zen answer I've ever seen on SO, very Alan Watts like... : D –  PruitIgoe Aug 6 '12 at 13:28
    
@PruitIgoe: I will read up on Alan Watts (on this project unicorn site: library.holtof.com/unicorn/watts/index.htm), thanks for the tip. Maybe I will find a way to float:up more effectively ,~) –  Billy Moon Aug 6 '12 at 13:45

Actually if you use float:left; in the second div than the second div will start after first div immediately.

Like this :- http://tinkerbin.com/FfuvHZw4

And if you use float:rightin the second div than the second div will start after from the right side of the parent div or body.

Like this :- http://tinkerbin.com/EgtjAJA1

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I think he already knew that :) –  Matei Mihai Aug 6 '12 at 9:51
    
+1 nice ......... –  Rohit Azad Aug 6 '12 at 9:55
    
i am just explained the variation of float:left-right; what can be possible from both point of view and its clear as well we and if he already knows that he should not ask the question –  Shailender Arora Aug 6 '12 at 9:55
    
@ShailenderArora : Thank you for your answer,i know abut float, even though i just tried to clarify my doubt,thank you –  prash Aug 6 '12 at 10:02
    
pleasure prash.......... –  Shailender Arora Aug 6 '12 at 10:32

Well, nothing wrong using float:right; Maybe your client have an idea about that. Could be a development issue.

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Thank you ..... –  prash Aug 6 '12 at 10:16

The only possible "plus" I can think of to not using float: right would be the fact that it causes inline elements that are floated right to appear in reverse order (unless the parent element is the one being floated, in which case its children will appear in the correct order). So, if the content (say a list of items) is pulled from the database in a specific order, the ORDER_BY would need to be reversed to get them to appear in the desired order. Likewise with the order of plain HTML elements. They may not want you to use float: right because they don't want to have to refactor other code.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/nxdD4/1/

That's about the only thing I can think of.

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Thank you...... –  prash Aug 6 '12 at 10:03
1  
@prash No problem :) If you found this answer or any of the others helpful, please remember to accept :) –  Chris Clower Aug 6 '12 at 10:07

Having ascertained that you will not look stupid for asking, I'd ask your client. Perhaps their reason has other implications you should be aware of, and perhaps Aurelius's reasoning might tie your hands unnecessarily, in the unlikely event that your client is not also thinking in terms of ancient philosophy.

Most likely explanation I can think of is code is more easily updated if the code is in the same order as it is rendered, (although I'd counter that using the correct semantics in your CSS is more important), your code is to appear in a page with other code, or your code is to be generated by a CMS, whose setup/management is simpler if things is in the same sequence, could have been picked up out of context, or some well-meaning forum respondent maybe cited less than relevant sources to them. The Roman emperors never were much good at the touchy feely.

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I'm going to go with the dreaded "Client read on another web site..." or "his nephew likes to build websites for his friends skating boarding pictures and told him..." answer. –  PruitIgoe Aug 6 '12 at 13:30

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