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class Foo
{
    public:
        void    action();
};

class Bar : public Foo
{
    public:
        void    action();
};

void Foo::action ()
{
    cout << "parent\n";
};

void Bar::action ()
{
    cout << "child\n";
};



int main()
{
    Foo* foo = new Bar ();
    foo->action();          // returns "parent" - "child" expected

    return 1;
 }

I'm sorry for a probably trivial question, but I'm new to C++... The 'foo' pointer must point to an instance of Foo class, since it can be any of Foo's childs e.g. Bar, Bar1, Bar2, Bar3 etc.

And at the same time 'foo->action()' should run an overridden function of the child. Tell me please, how do I correct the code to reach my goals... Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unlike other languages, like Java, in C++ base class have to specifically mark the methods it allows overriding of by using keyword virtual

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Большое спасибо, Роман :) –  Kolyunya Aug 6 '12 at 10:14
    
Незачто, Колюня –  Roman Saveljev Aug 6 '12 at 10:30

The member function needs to be declared virtual (unlike Java for example, where all methods are implicitly virtual):

class Foo
{
public:
    virtual void action(); 
};
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My great thanks to you hmjd for your answer. –  Kolyunya Aug 6 '12 at 10:19

Use keyword virtual for parent-class function. And also, your parent class should have virtual destructor.

class Foo
{
    public:
        virtual void    action();
};

class Bar : public Foo
{
    public:
        void    action();
};

void Foo::action ()
{
    cout << "parent\n";
};

void Bar::action ()
{
    cout << "child\n";
};



int main()
{
    Foo* foo = new Bar ();
    foo->action();          // returns "parent" - "child" expected

    return 1;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
My great thanks to you ForEveR for your answer. –  Kolyunya Aug 6 '12 at 10:20
1  
@Kolyunya since, when you call delete foo (you should call it), if Foo d-tor is not virtual - it will be called and Bar d-tor will not be called, thats incorrect. –  ForEveR Aug 6 '12 at 10:29
    
@ForEveR: Strictly speaking this is undefined behaviour. You might find that the wrong destructor is called, you might just find your program crashes. In any case, virtual destructor is needed. –  john Aug 6 '12 at 10:31

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