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I tried to ask this before, and messed up the question, so I'll try again. Is it possible to make an object return false by default when put in an if statement? What I want:

$dog = new DogObject();
if($dog)
{
   return "This is bad;"
}
else
{
   return "Excellent!  $dog was false!"
}

Is there a way this is possible? It's not completely necessary, but would save me some lines of code. thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Okay, let me clarify a little, because I think in trying to simplify the question, people aren't understanding the heart of it. So here goes: I'm using Zend Framework, which means that I often am using models (for those that don't know they're essentially a quick way to insert/update/whatever with a database). I often call, for example, Users->insertNewUser() in one of my controllers. If it is successful, it returns a Zend_Db_Table_Rowset. However, lets say that username already existed. I don't want to just return false, because that won't tell me what went wrong. –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 18:56
    
I love this question because it's got a Dog object, Have you tried the Implicit Cast Overloading? –  Dog Ears Jul 25 '09 at 18:56
    
Instead I've created an object called modelResult, that carries with it the reason that the model failed to perform it's function. What I want is to be able to, back in the controller, be able to say $result = Users->insertNewUser(). if($result){return $result} else{ (CHECK WHAT WENT WRONG AND SAY WHY)}. I know I could do this by checking $result's type. I know there are a ton of ways I could do this. But, I was just wondering if I could make my ModelResult object return false because it would just be a lot easier to use. Is there a way to do this? If the answer is no, then I'll manage. –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 19:01
    
Please note: I know other ways of doing this. I could throw an exception. I could return a string and then read the string. There are lots of ways. All I want to know is if it's possible or not to make the object false in an if statement the same way it returns false for an empty string and an int of 0. –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 19:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, PHP has no support for operator overloading. Maybe they'll add it in a future version.

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Okay, that's all I needed! Thanks! –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 19:09

I was attempting to do this myself and found a solution that appears to work.

In response to the others who were trying to answer the question by telling the asker to use a different solution, I will also try to explain the reason for the question. Neither the original poster or I want to use an exception, because the point is not to use exception handling features and put that burden on any code we use this class in. The point, at least for me, was to be able to use this class seamlessly in other PHP code that may be written in a non-object-oriented or non-exception-based style. Many built-in PHP functions are written in such a way that a result of false for unsuccessful processes is desirable. At the same time, we might want to be able to handle this object in a special way in our own code.

For example, we might want to do something like:

if ( !($goodObject = ObjectFactory::getObject($objectType)) ) {
  // if $objectType was not something ObjectFactory could handle, it
  // might return a Special Case object such as FalseObject below
  // (see Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture)
  // in order to indicate something went wrong.
  // (Because it is easy to do it this way.)
  //
  // FalseObject could have methods for displaying error information.
}

Here's a very simple implementation.

class FalseObject {
  public function __toString() {
    // return an empty string that in PHP evaluates to false
    return '';
  }
}

$false = new FalseObject();

if ( $false ) {
  print $false . ' is false.';
} else {
  print $false . ' is true.';
}

print '<br />';

if ( !$false ) {
  print $false . ' is really true.';
} else {
  print $false . ' is really false.';
}

// I am printing $false just to make sure nothing unexpected is happening.

The output is:

is false. is really false.

I've tested this and it works even if you have some declared variables inside the class, such as:

class FalseObject {
  const flag = true;
  public $message = 'a message';
  public function __toString() {
    return '';
  }
}


A slightly more interesting implementation might be:

class FalseException extends Exception {
  final public function __toString() {
    return '';
  }
}

class CustomException extends FalseException { }

$false = new CustomException('Something went wrong.');

Using the same test code as before, $false evaluates to false.

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finally, someone who understands! I actually just ended up using instanceof, which wasn't that much extra, so it wasn't that bad. Thanks for the help though. –  Ethan Aug 18 '09 at 18:58
    
this is exactly what I was looking for. I'm surprised this works. –  Flion Feb 19 at 16:31
1  
Actually this doesn't work... you've got the checks turned around. If($false) is triggered, meaning is evaluated as truthy, yet you print is false –  Flion Feb 26 at 14:14

Use the instanceof keyword.

For example

$result = Users->insertNewUser();

if($result instanceof MyErrorClass){
  (CHECK WHAT WENT WRONG AND SAY WHY)
} else {
  //Go on about our business because everything worked.
}

Info is here.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks. I'll do that. –  Ethan Jul 27 '09 at 15:19

Use this? Not a real neat solution, but does what you want:

<?php

    class Foo
    {
    	private $valid = false;

    	public function Bar ( )
    	{
    		// Do stuff
    	}

    	public function __toString ( )
    	{
    		return ( $this -> valid ) ? '1' : '0';
    	}
    }

?>

Zero is considered false, one is considered true by PHP

share|improve this answer

Putting something in "an if statement" is simply evaluating the variable there as a boolean.

In your example, $dog would need to be always false for that to work. There is no way to tell when your variable is about to be evaluated in a boolean expression.

What is your ultimate purpose here? What lines of code are you trying to save?

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Well, technically there's falsy and truthy. For example if you put $string = "", and then do if($string), $string will be considered false. It is the same with the int 0. I was just wondering if there was a way to make DogObject falsy. –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 18:44
1  
Okay, I see what you're trying to do. I think someone mentioned this in your other thread, but what you're really looking to do is a try/catch. You try the insert, and then catch any exceptions thrown. –  thedz Jul 25 '09 at 19:00

I'm not sure about the object itself. Possible. You could try something like, add a public property to the DogObject class and then have that set by default to false. Such as.

class DogObject
{
    var $isValid = false;

    public function IsValid()
    {
        return $isValid;
    }
}

And then when you would instantiate it, it would be false by default.

$dog = new DogObject();
if($dog->IsValid())
{
   return "This is bad;"
}
else
{
   return "Excellent!  $dog was false!"
}

Just a thought.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but the idea is that it would be more along the lines of: $dog = couldReturnDogObjectButCouldAlsoBeArray(); if($dog)... etc. if $dog isn't necessarily a DogObject, and I called IsValid() on it, then my program would crash. However, if I could make DogObject false in an if statement, then I could return true when it's an array, and return false when it's a DogObject. –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 18:50

If I understand what your asking, I think you want to do this:

if (!$dog){
     return "$dog was false";
}

The ! means not. SO you could read that, "If not dog, or if dog is NOT true"

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I'm sorry if this is not what you were looking for... if its not just leave a message, don't downvote me to much, I had trouble understanding your question... figured I'd give it a shot. –  micmoo Jul 25 '09 at 18:45

Under what conditions do you want if($dog) to evaluate to false? You can't do what you've literally asked for, but perhaps the conditioned could be replaced by something that does what you want.

share|improve this answer
class UserController
{
  public function newuserAction()
  {
    $userModel = new UserModel();
    if ($userModel->insertUser()) {
      // Success!
    } else {
      die($userModel->getError());
    }
  }
}

Or

class UserController
{
  public function newuserAction()
  {
    $userModel = new UserModel();
    try {
      $userModel->insertUser()
    }
    catch (Exception $e) {
      die($e);
    }
  }
}

There are a million ways to handle errors. It all depends on the complexity of the error and the amount of recovery options.

share|improve this answer

How about using an Implicit Cast Operator like the following C# ?

like so:

    class DogObject
    {
        public static implicit operator bool(DogObject a)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

Then you can go...

    var dog = new DogObject();

    if(!dog)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("dog was false");
    }
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't work in PHP, but thanks! –  Ethan Jul 25 '09 at 19:08
    
I was too hasty to answer this without reading the question/tags! My apologies. –  Dog Ears Jul 25 '09 at 22:46

I recently had to do something similar, using the null object pattern. Unfortunately, the null object was returning true and the variable in question was sometimes an actual null value (from the function's default parameter). The best way I came up with was if((string)$var) { although this wouldn't work for empty arrays.

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