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If I am having

char = 'a'

how can I increase the value into 'b' and then into 'c' and so on..

I don't want to replace it or change it. Its much like

char = char + 1
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9  
does z wrap around into a? –  jamylak Aug 6 '12 at 11:18

4 Answers 4

>>> chr(ord('a') + 1)
'b'
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You can make an incrementer translation like this. I've mapped 'z' back onto 'a' in this case

>>> from string import maketrans, ascii_lowercase
>>> char_incrementer = maketrans(ascii_lowercase, ascii_lowercase[1:]+ascii_lowercase[0])
>>> 'a'.translate(char_incrementer)
'b'

you can just as easily apply it to a whole string

>>> 'hello'.translate(char_incrementer)
'ifmmp'
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Like this:

char = chr(ord(char) + 1)

or perhaps more pythonic like this:

from string import ascii_lowercase
char = ascii_lowercase[ascii_lowercase.index(char) + 1]

Beware that both of these methods have potentially undesired behaviour after you reach z.

Without knowing what you're going to use it for it's hard to say for certain, but I would look into whether you can do whatever it is you're doing in a way that avoids this problem. For instance, if you have code like this:

char = "a"
while True:
    if xxx():
        break
    if yyy():
        continue
    value = zzz()
    print char, value
    char = chr(ord(char) + 1)

Do it like this instead:

def find_values():
    while True:
        if xxx():
            break
        if yyy():
            continue
        yield zzz()

for char, value in zip(ascii_lowercase, find_values()):
    print char, value
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2  
I think the first one is better and second is unnecessary –  jamylak Aug 6 '12 at 11:21
1  
The .index call is very slow –  gnibbler Aug 6 '12 at 11:31
1  
@gnibbler Its asymptotic behaviour as the string length increases is O(n), yes, but since the string is always 26 characters long it's not very slow. Timeit shows it's less than 50% slower than using chr and ord. But it's a good thing to be aware of when considering using the index method. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Aug 6 '12 at 11:39
    
ascii_lowercase[(ascii_lowercase.index(char) + 1)%26] will make z -> a –  dansalmo Jul 18 '13 at 19:35
>>> chr((ord('a')+1)%97%26 + 97)
'b'
>>> chr((ord('z')+1)%97%26 + 97)
'a'
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