Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I expected [super class] to return the superclass's class, however I found, using this code that it returns this class's class.

Code

NSLogObject([self class]);
NSLogObject([super class]);
NSLogObject([self superclass]);
NSLogBool([self class] == [super class]);

Output

[self class]: MainMenuScene
[super class]: MainMenuScene
[self superclass]: CCScene
[self class] == [super class]:[YES]

Can somebody explain why this happens please?. I expect it to return the same value as [self superclass].

Macros:
-------
#define NSLogBool(i)   NSLog(@"%s:[%@]", #i, (i) ? @"YES" : @"NO")
#define NSLogObject(o) NSLog(@"%s:[%@]", #o, o)
share|improve this question
2  
And just incase I didn't say "class" enough: "Class class class class class!" – James Webster Aug 6 '12 at 11:55
    
You shouldn't use apple prefixes in your own classes or macros (or just any other identifier) – JustSid Aug 6 '12 at 12:03
1  
I should if I want them to show up when I type NSLog... :P – James Webster Aug 6 '12 at 12:03
up vote 5 down vote accepted

[super class] calls the super method on the current instance (i.e. self). If self had an overridden version, then it would be called and it would look different. Since you don't override it, calling [self class] is the same as calling [super class].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm just being dozy and assuming a method called "class" should somehow act differently to the rest of oop! – James Webster Aug 6 '12 at 12:05
    
I admit I fell into the same trap for a second while reading your question. No worries. – mprivat Aug 6 '12 at 14:57
1  
even if you didn't override it, it is possible that [self class] is not the same as [super class], if self is an instance of a subclass which overrides the method; then it would call that subclass's implementation – newacct Aug 6 '12 at 17:58
1  
I don't really understand this answer. There is no super method. super is a keyword. – Riaz Rizvi Aug 2 '13 at 22:24
    
@RiazRizvi: What they meant was "the superclass's implementation of the method" without saying it in so many words. – newacct Aug 5 '13 at 5:31

super refers to the method implementation in the superclass. If you don't override the method in your class, the implementation in your class and its superclass is the same.

Both [super class] and [self class] call the same method, defined on NSObject.

share|improve this answer
1  
even if you didn't override it, it is possible that [self class] is not the same as [super class], if self is an instance of a subclass which overrides the method; then it would call that subclass's implementation – newacct Aug 6 '12 at 17:58
    
@newacct I know. – Sulthan Aug 6 '12 at 18:49

While the answers by mprivat and Sulthan are technically correct, the current case is a bit more complicated (and interesting):

Considering the implementation of the call to the method. It uses (of course) the object pointer. An object pointer is a pointer to a struct that has as its first element (isa) is a pointer to the objects class. The class methods (that is, as mprivat and Sulthan has stated correctly, the very same in both cases) follows this pointer to determine the class, i.e., always the class of the calling object.

As a result, if A is the superclass of B, both calls [self class] and [super class] called by an instance of B, return the class of B (not of A, what one may expect because of a missing override!).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.