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I have a method in a class LinkRepository, I am checking for duplicate entries in the vector array Datalinks, which is a member of the class. I loop through all the elements in the array to check in the new entry Datalink* datalink already exist in the array. If so then don't add, just exit the loop.

void LinkRepository::SaveLink(Datalink* datalink) {
bool Exist = false;

for(vector<Datalink*>::iterator dl = Datalinks.begin(); dl != Datalinks.end(); ++dl)
{
     if((strstr((*dl)->ParentID, datalink->ParentID) != NULL) && (strstr((*dl)->ChildID,datalink->ChildID) != NULL))
     {
          Exist = true;

          dl = Datalinks.end();
     }
}

    if(!Exist)
    {
        Datalinks.push_back(datalink);
    }
};

My program seems to crash on the next loop of the statement dl = Datalinks.end();

I have no idea why it is crashing?

share|improve this question
1  
If you don't want duplicates, are you sure std::vector is the right choice? There are other data structures that prevent duplicates more efficiently, like std::set and std::unordered_set. – fredoverflow Aug 6 '12 at 12:05
    
@FredOverflow do you maybe have sources I can look at to see which is the better one to use? I chose std::vector because I want a dynamic array, also I do the duplicate checking myself, because I have to look at the members of the ParentID and ChildID in the Datalink objects. Not use it std::set1 or std::unordered_set can do this for me? – ZioN Aug 6 '12 at 12:29
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Replace

dl = Datalinks.end();

With:

break;

To exit the loop

Here is a simple example to illustrate why your solution can't work:

int i = 0;
for (; i != 10; ++i)
{
    i = 10;
}

This loop will never end because i will be incremented to 11 before comparison i != 10

share|improve this answer
1  
You can also change dl = Datalinks.end(); to dl = Datalinks.rbegin();. That will set dl to one before end, so the increment will make it equal to end. Another way is to change the test from dl != Datalinks.end() to dl >= Datalinks.end(). There are many ways to fix it, but break is probably the best. – David Schwartz Aug 6 '12 at 12:10
    
@Andrew This did the the trick, and your example explained well why it was not working, thanks. – ZioN Aug 6 '12 at 12:10
1  
@DavidSchwartz: This breaks when reverse-iterators do not have the same type as [forward-]iterators and really relies on the container's implementation details rather than its abstractions. – phresnel Aug 6 '12 at 12:43
1  
@phresnel: I agree. – David Schwartz Aug 7 '12 at 2:33

It is crashing because first you set the iterator to Datalinks.end() and then, upon leaving this iteration, the for loop itself increments the iterator, making an invalid operation.

share|improve this answer
for(vector<Datalink*>::iterator dl = Datalinks.begin(); dl != Datalinks.end() && !Exist; ++dl)
{
     if((strstr((*dl)->ParentID, datalink->ParentID) != NULL) && (strstr((*dl)->ChildID,datalink->ChildID) != NULL))
     {
          Exist = true;
     }
}

Like everyone had said you are iterating one over. So, it's going into unwanted memory locations resulting in a seg fault eventually. You have to realize that the ++dl is happening at the end of the loop.

Also, using a break statement here is ridiculous. You already have a bool, make use of it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the alternative idea, just a question? Why do yo see the break statement here as being ridiculous? – ZioN Aug 8 '12 at 5:38

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