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Am using Gradle for the first time on a multi-module project and was wondering if there was any kind of consensus on the right/best way to do dependency management for such an effort. From what I can tell, there are two approaches and this first one seems more widely accepted. It would look something like: [Sorry if this made up project is lame! ]

-- MyProject
---- settings.gradle
---- build.gradle
---- coreProject
---- servicesProject
------ servicesSubProject
---- warProject
---- common

Following this approach all the management is done in a single build.gradle file (other external .gradle files may be used to define various artifacts), and the individual project dependencies would be managed in their respective 'project' definition sections something like:

project('servicesProject:servicesSubProject') {
    dependencies {
        compile project(':common')
        compile spring.data
        compile spring.framework.persistence
        compile spring.framework.security
        compile persistence.hibernate.core
        compile persistence.postgresql
    }
}

The alternative is to have a build.gradle file for each subproject like this (here the dependencies for the subproject are in that project's build.gradle file's dependencies section):

-- MyProject
---- settings.gradle
---- build.gradle
---- coreProject
------ build.gradle
---- servicesProject
------ build.gradle
------ servicesSubProject
-------- build.gradle
---- warProject
------ build.gradle
---- common
------ build.gradle

As I said, from what I was able to read, it seems like the first approach is more widely used than the second. The Spring Framework gradle files are setup this way. However, before I went ahead full-throttle with that, I thought I should ask to see if there were tradeoffs or other impacts I should also be aware of. Thanks for any thoughts!

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1 Answer 1

Having a separate build script for each subproject is probably more common. It's a natural way to break up one big script into multiple smaller ones, which generally is a good thing. That said, some teams prefer to have a single build script, and Gradle is flexible enough to accommodate that.

If you go with multiple build scripts, it pays off to name them after the subproject they belong to. This can be achieved by adding the following code to settings.gradle (the code assumes that there is just one level of subprojects):

rootProject.children.each { it.buildFileName = it.name + ".gradle" }

PS: Even though dependency declarations often form a large part of a subproject's build script, the decision whether to go with one or multiple build scripts isn't specific to dependency management.

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Peter, thanks for your insight. Thinking about this more, the single build script approach for dependency management won't scale very well. So if your number of sub-projects is very large that approach will likely be more of a burden than a help. However, we are in a situation similar to Spring - less than 20 subprojects. Having all the dependencies easily controlled in a single place seems to help. We do have other gradle build files as well for specialized subprojects (wtp projects), and files to control specific versions, but for now, controlling the dependencies in the main one. –  JoeG Aug 10 '12 at 12:51
    
If it makes sense to have build.gradle's named after the subproject name, why not make it the default? Can you be more explicit about the benefits of this convention? –  Emil Sit Aug 14 '12 at 4:16

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