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I have a simple problem:

Class A{

    B b;

    public void doSth{ 
         //This method should execute only once
         b.modify(); //calls doSth() again...
    }
}

As the program runs, an instance of A is passed to B, and B calls doSth (as a callback for instance). b.modify makes B to call A.doSth() again, which will infinite sequence of calls. What I want to achieve is this: I want to execute doSth() once, modify B, then upon next execution somehow stop the chain of inifinite calls and do not execute b.modify.

Any suggestions greatly appreciated.

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3  
Why not use a flag that you set false the first time? –  thegrinner Aug 6 '12 at 13:04
3  
You could achieve that e.g. with an additional parameter to the method, but isn't this more a design question? What are you trying to model? –  twoflower Aug 6 '12 at 13:05
    
As per coding guidelines, this will be considered as a circular dependency and should be avoided. Since you are asking, we could maintain a static boolean in A class which controls the execution of doSth in class A for only once. –  sundar Aug 6 '12 at 13:06
2  
I agree with @twoflower - obviously from the answers, you can use a flag, but it feels like a design smell. What are you actually doing? –  jeff Aug 6 '12 at 13:06
    
I register listener on the JFreeChart, and the listener modifies one of the series, causing ChartChangeEvent to be raised again and calling my listener... –  Bober02 Aug 6 '12 at 13:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Add a state flag to your class:

Class A {

    B b;
    private volatile boolean called;

    public synchronized void doSth { 
         if (called) return;
         called = true;
         b.modify();
    }
}

Use volatile if multiple threads are in play.

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Perhaps you want to clear the flag as well otherwise doSth will never be called again. Otherwise you could just clear b = null; and check for null. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 6 '12 at 13:20
    
Shouldn't use this example in real concurrent cases. You can get both threads run "if" and both will pass to the next line. It's better to use CAS here, something like: <pre> private final AtomicBoolean called = new AtomicBoolean(); and then if (!called.compareAndSet(false, true)) return; </pre> or if you prefer to use "plain and pure" style, use double checking with synchronized: <pre> boolean mayPass = false; if (!called) { synchronized(this) { // or some external object if (!called) { called = true; mayPass = true; } } } if (!mayPass) return; ... </pre> –  dchekmarev Dec 12 '13 at 17:16
    
@dchekmarev you're right! I can't believe I omitted synchronization... (made method synchronized - good enough for the example) –  Bohemian Dec 13 '13 at 0:18

You can have a boolean field and set it true the first time you call the method.

Class A{
    boolean isModified = false;
    B b;

    public void doSth{ 
        if(!isModified) {
            this.isModified = true;
            b.modify();
        }
    }
}
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doesn't work .. you have to change isModified first –  Razvan Aug 6 '12 at 13:06
    
Yep, I corrected it, thanks. –  Autar Aug 6 '12 at 13:06

I'd try to find a solution that doesn't involve circular dependencies. Do A and B really have to reference eachother? On a higher level, what are you trying to achieve? Could you post some client code using A and B objects?

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Add a boolean alreadyExecuted to class A and modify the implementation of doSmth() to

 public void doSth{ 
     if(!alreadyExecuted){
         alreadyExecuted = true; 
         b.modify(); 

     }
}
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Consider this as a Hack...

Use boolean variable

Class A{

    B b;
    public isOk = true;

    public void doSth{ 

        if (isOk){

         b.modify(); 
         isOk = false;

        }

}
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maybe you should change design to not call those method recursively, or if you cant just add parameter to your doSth method

doSth(boolean modify)
 {
  if (modify) 
  {
    b.modify();
  }
  ...
 }
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Put your job in the constructor

Class A{

   B b;

   A(){
       //This should execute only once
       b.modify(); //calls doSth() again...
   }

}
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This is a fix for "best" example, coz noone should really use it in concurrent/multithreading cases. You can get both threads run "if" and both will pass to the next line. It's better to use CAS here, something like:

private final AtomicBoolean called = new AtomicBoolean();

and then

if (!called.compareAndSet(false, true)) return;

or if you prefer to use "plain and pure" style, use double checking with synchronized:

private volatile boolean called;

and then

boolean mayPass = false;
if (!called) {
  synchronized(this) { // or some external object
    if (!called) {
      called = true;
      mayPass = true;
    }
  }
}
if (!mayPass) return;
...
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