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I have a native method which needs a pointer to write out a dword (uint).

Now I need to get the actual uint value from the (Int)pointer, but the Marshal class only has handy methods for reading (signed) integers.

How do I get the uint value from the pointer?

I've searched the questions (and Google), but couldn't really find what I needed.

Sample (not working) code:

IntPtr pdwSetting = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(uint)));

        try
        {
            // I'm trying to read the screen contrast here
            NativeMethods.JidaVgaGetContrast(_handleJida, pdwSetting);
            // this is not what I want, but close
            var contrast = Marshal.ReadInt32(pdwSetting);
        }
        finally
        {
            Marshal.FreeHGlobal(pdwSetting);
        }

The return value from the native function is a dword between 0 and 255 with 255 being full contrast.

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Can you please provide your sample code for our reference. –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 6 '12 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Depending on whether you may use usafe code you can even do:

static unsafe void Method()
{
    IntPtr pdwSetting = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(uint)));

    try
    {
        NativeMethods.JidaVgaGetContrast(_handleJida, pdwSetting);
        var contrast = *(uint*)pdwSetting;
    }
    finally
    {
        Marshal.FreeHGlobal(pdwSetting);
    }
}

Note, that a C++ function pointer like

void (*GetContrastPointer)(HANDLE handle, unsigned int* setting);

can be marshaled as

[DllImport("*.dll")]
void GetContrast(IntPtr handle, IntPtr setting); // most probably what you did

but also as

[DllImport("*.dll")]
void GetContrast(IntPtr handle, ref uint setting);

which lets you write code like

uint contrast = 0; // or some other invalid value
NativeMethods.JidaVgaGetContrast(_handleJida, ref contrast);

which is superior in both performance and readability.

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I had totally forgotten about ref, how foolish of me. That's what I ended up with, thanks. –  Davio Aug 7 '12 at 6:29

You can simply cast it to uint:

uint contrast = (uint)Marshal.ReadInt32(pdwSetting);

For example:

int i = -1;
uint j = (uint)i;
Console.WriteLine(j);

outputs 4294967295.

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But positive values would have the same value and this is wrong, because the initial int readout is wrong. –  Davio Aug 7 '12 at 6:33
    
No, the code above does what you want. You are a little confused here. This code behaves in exactly the same way as the unsafe code in the answer you accepted. –  David Heffernan Aug 7 '12 at 7:04
    
Okay, I thought that a value like 101 would be 5 when read as a uint and -1 when read with ReadInt32 and that converting -1 would give the high value you wrote down instead of the 5 I was looking for. In a way, I thought that it would falsely read the high order bit as a sign but. –  Davio Aug 7 '12 at 13:15
    
@Davio It does read the high order bit as the sign bit. But the high order bit for 0 is not set. The (uint) cast just re-interprets the bit pattern as a uint. Anyway, using an overload that takes ref uint, as per your accepted answer, is the best way to solve your problem. But the (unit) cast is the idiomatic way to do precisely what you ask in your question. So, I think I answered the direct question that you asked, but you accepted answer is the right solution for your underlying problem. Often that's a subtle difference! –  David Heffernan Aug 7 '12 at 13:31

Use the Marshal.PtrToStructure overload that takes an IntPtr and a type and pass in typeof(uint) - that ought to work!

Hope this helps!

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This seems to work, although I'm not sure, because currently the native method will always return 0 due to hardware limitations. Once I'm able to test it, I will post back. –  Davio Aug 6 '12 at 13:42
    
@Davio - What hardware limitations? –  Ramhound Aug 6 '12 at 15:12
    
@Ramhound I believe he means his native library is always returning 0 at this time (due to some limitation) - so he has no way of testing his library with values larger than int.MaxValue. Am I correct? –  ananthonline Aug 6 '12 at 15:37
    
@ananthonline You are correct. One of the wires is soldered in a way that the current contrast is not set correctly, so it will always return 0. –  Davio Aug 7 '12 at 13:12

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