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I'm doing some calculations and I end up with 65.0 or 43.5.
I need to add a zero to this number so that my number comparison works:

$this->sub_total == $order_sub_total

I've tested using number_format():

$total = number_format($total, 2, '.');

But that gives me er msg: Wrong parameter count for number_format()

I'm tempted to just do:

$total = $total.'0';

But I think that is a bad idea in case the number is 35.43.

So how can I add a extra decimal to my number?

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1  
number_format($total, 2); –  Dale Aug 6 '12 at 13:44
1  
If you mention the decimal separator, you have to also use the thousands separator. –  Matt Aug 6 '12 at 13:45
    
@matt Thanks, I didn't know that. I've read the documentation, but it's not always as easy to understand :) –  Steven Aug 6 '12 at 13:46
    
@Dale some regions use , as the decimal separator, so number_format($total, 2) isn't universally correct. To be sure that OP gets the result he wants, he must use number_format($total, 2, '.', ',');. –  Matt Aug 6 '12 at 13:48
    
@Matt You should of posted that as an answer, I couldn't be arsed explaining so I put it as a comment. –  Dale Aug 6 '12 at 13:49

3 Answers 3

With number_format() you need either two or four parameters. Three will always through an error.

For you both of the following will work identically:

$total = number_format($total, 2);

$total = number_format($total, 2, '.', ',');
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Thanks. As @dale also suggested, just using number_format($total, 2)worked like a charm. And now I understand how number_format works :) –  Steven Aug 6 '12 at 13:47

If you mention the decimal separator, you have to also use the thousands separator.

So either do

number_format($total, 2);

OR

number_format($total, 2, '.', ',');

Here's the documentation.

Since some regions use , as the decimal separator, so number_format($total, 2) isn't universally correct. To be sure that you get the result you want, you must use number_format($total, 2, '.', ',');.

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Why not a plain old $total = sprintf("%01.2f", $total) ?

Edit:

1 million iterations timing with $n = 3.14159:

$total = sprintf("%01.2f", $n);               9.148s
$total = number_format($n, 2);                8.296s
$total = number_format($n, 2, ".", ",");     10.944s

So sprintf is slightly better than a full-fledged number_format with separators.

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Because number_format() makes your intent clear without having to comment? –  Matt Aug 6 '12 at 13:51
    
1 million iterations timing with $n = 3.14159: $total = sprintf("%01.2f", $n); 9.148s $total = number_format($n, 2); 8.296s $total = number_format($n, 2, ".", ","); 10.944s So sprintf is slightly better than a full-fledged number_format with separators. –  Cyrille Aug 6 '12 at 14:02
    
faster != better but I understand your point. When it comes to maintainability I prefer seeing code that immediately expresses the author's intent, rather than code that saves 2 seconds on 1 million iterations. –  Matt Aug 6 '12 at 14:05
    
One point for maintainability. But I've grown accustomed to associating PHP with "code that runs on a server with potentially millions of customers in realtime" and thus strive to provide the best performance when it comes to code. I tried again with a large number with 4 or 5 thousands-separators, and it takes approx. 1.4x the time. –  Cyrille Aug 6 '12 at 14:19
1  
That's a great point. First I was just answering your rhetorical "why not", then I had to clarify. Cheers! –  Matt Aug 6 '12 at 14:21

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