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I'm trying to get the following effect (using this local file http://localhost/[company_name]/[project_name]/.htaccess):

http://localhost/[company_name]/[project_name]/page-1 (adds slash)
http://localhost/[company_name]/[project_name]/page-1/ (does nothing)
http://localhost/[company_name]/[project_name]/page-1/subpage-1 (adds slash)
http://www.example.com/page-1 (adds slash)<br />
http://www.example.com/page-1/ (does nothing)
etc.

The thing I want to accomplish is that this .htaccess doesn't need the path http://localhost/[company_name]/[project_name]/ anymore so that I don't have to edit this each time it's been uploaded.

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteRule ^(.*[^/])$ /$1/ [L,R=301]

I found the code above here: Add Trailing Slash to URLs, but it only makes it possible to use the HOST dynamically and discards the path. Does someone a solution to accomplish this effect?

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RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !(/$|\.) RewriteRule (.*) %{REQUEST_URI}/ [R=301,L] –  Simon Aug 6 '12 at 14:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !(/$|\.) 
RewriteRule (.*) %{REQUEST_URI}/ [R=301,L] 
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Don't think this works to turn www.mydomain.com into www.mydomain.com/ –  jeffkee Jul 17 '13 at 1:06
    
The root domain is not included. on the webserver the mydomain.com and mydomain.com have exactly the same URI. For SEO reasons, they are treated as the same for the root domain, with or without trailing slashes –  maskie Aug 5 '13 at 3:05
    
add ^$ in condition to avoid '/' at the end of domain RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !(/$|\.|^$) RewriteRule (.*) %{REQUEST_URI}/ [R=301,L] –  mukund Dec 17 '13 at 6:12

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