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I'm trying to use pointers of arrays to use as arguments for a function which generates an array.

void generateArray(int *a[],  int *si){
  srand(time(0));
  for (int j=0;j<*si;j++)
       *a[j]=(0+rand()%9);
} //end generateArray;

int main() {
  const int size=5;
  int a[size];

  generateArray(&a, &size);

  return 0;
} //end main

But when I compile this this message appears:

cannot convert `int (*)[5]' to `int**' for argument `1' to `void generateArray(int**, int*)'
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2  
There's a few more issues worth pointing out to you - one, don't pass a const int by reference, pass it by value. Two, call: generateArray(a, sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0])). Verbose but this is standard best practice when working with arrays. –  djechlin Aug 6 '12 at 14:06
3  
If this is C++ you'd better use std::vector or std::array: They still know their size when passed to a function. –  moooeeeep Aug 6 '12 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're over-complicating it - it just needs to be:

void generateArray(int *a, int si)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < si; j++)
        a[j] = rand() % 9;
}

int main()
{
    const int size=5;
    int a[size];

    generateArray(a, size);

    return 0;
}

When you pass an array as a parameter to a function it decays to a pointer to the first element of the array. So there is normally never a need to pass a pointer to an array.

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I know it is over-complicating the whole code, but the objective of this was using pointers –  Ortharios Aug 6 '12 at 14:39
4  
@Ortharios: This is using pointers. Because through an error in language design, int a[], when used as a function parameter, is actually int* a. You'll see Konrad, below dashblinkenlight's answer, recommending against the confusing syntax, and I whole-heartedly agree. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 6 '12 at 14:47
1  
If it makes you happier I've changed the declaration for generateArray so that it now takes an explicit pointer. It's still the same function signature so this is just a cosmetic change, but hopefully it now satisfies the "uses pointers" requirement ? –  Paul R Aug 6 '12 at 16:30

int *a[], when used as a function parameter (but not in normal declarations), is a pointer to a pointer, not a pointer to an array (in normal declarations, it is an array of pointers). A pointer to an array looks like this:

int (*aptr)[N]

Where N is a particular positive integer (not a variable).

If you make your function a template, you can do it and you don't even need to pass the size of the array (because it is automatically deduced):

template<size_t SZ>
void generateArray(int (*aptr)[SZ])
{
    for (size_t i=0; i<SZ; ++i)
        (*aptr)[i] = rand() % 9;
}

int main()
{    
    int a[5];    
    generateArray(&a);
}

You could also take a reference:

template<size_t SZ>
void generateArray(int (&arr)[SZ])
{
    for (size_t i=0; i<SZ; ++i)
        arr[i] = rand() % 9;
}

int main()
{    
    int a[5];    
    generateArray(a);
}
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1  
+1, but note that the template solution has the negative side effect of generating one function per array size that is used there. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 6 '12 at 14:47

You do not need to take a pointer to the array in order to pass it to an array-generating function, because arrays already decay to pointers when you pass them to functions. Simply make the parameter int a[], and use it as a regular array inside the function, the changes will be made to the array that you have passed in.

void generateArray(int a[],  int si) {
    srand(time(0));
    for (int j=0;j<*si;j++)
        a[j]=(0+rand()%9);
}

int main(){
    const int size=5;
    int a[size];
    generateArray(a, size);
    return 0;
}

As a side note, you do not need to pass the size by pointer, because you are not changing it inside the function. Moreover, it is not a good idea to pass a pointer to constant to a parameter that expects a pointer to non-constant.

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2  
IMHO it’s just misleading to declare a parameter as x[]. Why not make it clear that it’s a pointer? –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 6 '12 at 14:13
1  
@KonradRudolph I agree, using a pointer is a "more honest" syntax. But since the OP used the empty square bracket syntax, I decided to stay with it. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 6 '12 at 14:16

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