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So I have simple tree:

class MyNode
{
 public MyNode Parent;
 public IEnumerable<MyNode> Elements;
 int group = 1;
}

I have a IEnumerable<MyNode>. I want to get a list of all MyNode (including inner node objects (Elements)) as one flat list Where group == 1. How to do such thing via LINQ?

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1  
What order do you want the flattened list to be in? –  Philip Aug 6 '12 at 14:23
1  
When do nodes stop having child nodes? I presume it's when Elements is null or empty? –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 6 '12 at 14:24
    
might be duplicate with stackoverflow.com/questions/11827569/… –  Tamir Aug 6 '12 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 36 down vote accepted

You can flatten a tree like this:

IEnumerable<MyNode> Flatten(IEnumerable<MyNode> e) {
    return e.SelectMany(c => Flatten(c.Elements)).Concat(new[] {e});
}

You can then filter by group using Where(...).

To earn some "points for style", convert Flatten to an extension function in a static class.

public static IEnumerable<MyNode> Flatten(this IEnumerable<MyNode> e) {
    return e.SelectMany(c => c.Elements.Flatten()).Concat(e);
}

To earn some points for "even better style", convert Flatten to a generic extension method that takes a tree and a function that produces descendents:

public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> e,
    Func<T,IEnumerable<T>> f) 
{
    return e.SelectMany(c => f(c).Flatten(f)).Concat(e);
}

Call this function like this:

IEnumerable<MyNode> tree = ....
var res = tree.Flatten(node => node.Elements);

If you would prefer flattening in pre-order rather than in post-order, switch around the sides of the Concat(...).

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@AdamHouldsworth Thanks for the edit! The element in the call to Concat should be new[] {e}, not new[] {c} (it wouldn't even compile with c there). –  dasblinkenlight Aug 6 '12 at 15:05
    
I disagree: compiled, tested, and working with c. Using e doesn't compile. You can also add if (e == null) return Enumerable.Empty<T>(); to cope with null child lists. –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 6 '12 at 15:08
    
Now that you've moved a bracket it'll compile :-) –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 6 '12 at 15:11
1  
more like ` public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> f) { if (source == null) return Enumerable.Empty<T>(); return source.SelectMany(c => f(c).Flatten(f)).Concat(source); }` –  myWallJSON Aug 8 '12 at 13:55
3  
Note that this solution is O(nh) where n is the number of items in the tree and h is the average depth of the tree. Since h can be between O(1) and O(n), this is between an O(n) and an O(n squared) algorithm. There are better algorithms. –  Eric Lippert Dec 2 '13 at 18:33

The problem with the accepted answer is that it is inefficient if the tree is deep. If the tree is very deep then it blows the stack. You can solve the problem by using an explicit stack:

public static IEnumerable<MyNode> Traverse(this MyNode root)
{
    var stack = new Stack<MyNode>();
    stack.Push(root);
    while(stack.Count > 0)
    {
        var current = stack.Pop();
        yield return current;
        foreach(var child in current.Elements)
            stack.Push(child);
    }
}

Assuming n nodes in a tree of height h and a branching factor considerably less than n, this method is O(1) in stack space, O(h) in heap space and O(n) in time. The other algorithm given is O(h) in stack, O(1) in heap and O(nh) in time. If the branching factor is small compared to n then h is between O(lg n) and O(n), which illustrates that the naïve algorithm can use a dangerous amount of stack and a large amount of time if h is close to n.

Now that we have a traversal, your query is straightforward:

root.Traverse().Where(item=>item.group == 1);
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Almost argued, then saw 'Eric Lippert', re-read, and now I understand :-) –  johnnycardy Jan 21 at 16:31
2  
@johnnycardy: If you were going to argue a point then perhaps the code is not obviously correct. What could make it more clearly correct? –  Eric Lippert Jan 21 at 16:50
1  
Firstly I didn't see how it went past the first layer; lack of recursion threw me off. Obviously that's the reason it's efficient. I just didn't read it properly. Secondly, Traverse is an extension on MyNode instead of IEnumerable - the OP doesn't have a root to call it with. Changing the solution to be a generic method on IEnumerable is kind of awkward. I did it by initialising the Stack<T> with the enumerable to keep it simple, but that enumerates the whole top layer of the tree up front. –  johnnycardy Jan 22 at 10:31
    
How this function could be used with IEnumerable instead of root? –  ebram tharwat Jun 19 at 9:39
2  
@ebramtharwat: Correct. You could call Traverse on all the elements. Or you could modify Traverse to take a sequence, and have it push all the elements of the sequence onto stack. Remember, stack is "elements I have not traversed yet". Or you could make a "dummy" root where your sequence is its children, and then traverse the dummy root. –  Eric Lippert Jun 19 at 16:05

The easiest / most clear way to address this is using a recursive LINQ query. This question: Expressing recursion in LINQ has a lot of discussion over this, and this particular answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/793531/1550 goes in some detail as to how you'd implement it.

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void Main()
{
    var allNodes = GetTreeNodes().Flatten(x => x.Elements);

    allNodes.Dump();
}

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Flatten<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> childrenSelector = null)
    {
        if (source == null)
        {
            return new List<T>();
        }

        var list = source;

        if (childrenSelector != null)
        {
            foreach (var item in source)
            {
                list = list.Concat(childrenSelector(item).Flatten(childrenSelector));
            }
        }

        return list;
    }
}

IEnumerable<MyNode> GetTreeNodes() {
    return new[] { 
        new MyNode { Elements = new[] { new MyNode() }},
        new MyNode { Elements = new[] { new MyNode(), new MyNode(), new MyNode() }}
    };
}

class MyNode
{
    public MyNode Parent;
    public IEnumerable<MyNode> Elements;
    int group = 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
using a foreach in your extension means it is no longer 'delayed execution' (unless of course you use yield return). –  Tri Q Mar 11 '13 at 23:29

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