Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to set user permissions to edit other users profile.

What I want is to be able to set for each user which user can be handled. So, let's say we have 5 users: A, B, C, D, E

I want A to be able to handle B, C and D. I want B to be able to handle A, E, C. And so on...

Is this a one-to-many or a many-to-many relation?

I'm not able to understand it because, it seems to me a one-to-many since there is one user having multiple users. But since the user itself can be handled by another one, makes me think it could be a many-to-many.

What questions should I ask to myself to identify the right relation?

share|improve this question
    
A handle B, C, D, etc. But A can be manipulated by several? –  FabianoLothor Aug 6 '12 at 14:33

5 Answers 5

This is a many to many relation, as one account can edit many, and many accounts can edit one account.

Example:

A can edit ABC  
B can edit AC 
C can edit BC

So A can be edited by multiple accounts (or belongs to multiple accounts), and can edit multiple accounts (or has multiple accounts)

share|improve this answer

Let's work through your problem and see how to identify the relationship.

When you're writing the code that will check whether a user is authorized, you are going to have two main pieces of data: The user that is performing the edit and the user that is being edited. So, the question your application will be asking is "can user A edit user B?"

Ignoring the semantics of relationships for a moment, think about how you'd look up the answer to that question:

table can_edit:
  requestor_id | edited_id | permission
  =====================================
  User A       | User B    | YES
  User A       | User C    | YES
  User A       | User D    | YES
  User A       | User E    | NO
  User B       | User A    | YES
  User B       | User C    | YES
  User B       | User D    | NO
  etc...

Using this lookup table, you can determine who has access to edit whom. But, look again at what this table is describing. Since you're looking up the answer to a YES/NO question, you can express it more simply:

table can_edit:
  requestor_id | edited_id | permission
  =====================================
  User A       | User B    | YES
  User A       | User C    | YES
  User A       | User D    | YES
  User B       | User A    | YES
  User B       | User C    | YES
  etc...

Here we've dropped the NO permissions. Now we can ask, "Do we have an entry in can_edit that matches our permission check?" If we perform a lookup and the row exists, then we can allow the access.

Now, since the permission column will always be YES, it doesn't make much sense to include it. So now we have a table that is basically a list of user ID relationships.

At this point we can draw out what the relationships look like using a database diagram:

users:
  user_id  <-----+
  email          |       can_edit:
  pass_digest    +-------- requestor_id
               +========== edited_id
users:         |
  user_id <====+
  email
  pass_digest

If we look at the example diagrams in the rails association guide, we can see that our diagram closely matches both has_many :through and has_and_belongs_to_many. These both describe many-to-many relationships.

As far as the implementation details go, you'll notice that both "can user A edit user B?" and "is user B a friend of user A?" are essentially the same question, just using different terms for the relationship. With that knowledge, you'll find that volumes have been written about how to define this self-referential has_many :through relationship, such as this excellent screencast by Ryan Bates.

share|improve this answer

if you are not sure, i recommend that you read the guides about rails associations. there are some nice examples and schema pictures, that illustrate the problems:

http://guides.rubyonrails.org/association_basics.html#the-has_and_belongs_to_many-association

share|improve this answer

This is a many-to-many relation because in your example A is on both sides of the relationship.

share|improve this answer

I guess is a M2M relationship because in the table How many? more than one is related with Hoy many more than one.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.