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I've got three different numpy arrays

a = array([ 0,  3,  6,  9, 12])
b = array([ 1,  4,  7, 10, 13])
c = array([ 2,  5,  8, 11, 14])

How can I join them using numpy methods that

d = array[(0,1,2,3,4,...,12,13,14)]

I don't want to write a loop like

for i in range(len(a)):
 [...]

This is only an example in my project the arrays are not sorted and I want to keep their order.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can transpose and flatten the arrays:

d = numpy.array([a, b, c]).T.flatten()

An alternative way to combine the arrays is to use numpy.vstack():

d = numpy.vstack((a, b, c)).T.flatten()

(I don't know which one is faster, by the way.)

Edit: In response to the answer by Nicolas Barbey, here is how to make do with copying the data only once:

d = numpy.empty((len(a), 3), dtype=a.dtype)
d[:, 0], d[:, 1], d[:, 2] = a, b, c
d = d.ravel()

This code ensures that the data is layed out in a way that ravel() does not need to make a copy, and indeed it is quite a bit faster than the original code on my machine:

In [1]: a = numpy.arange(0, 30000, 3)
In [2]: b = numpy.arange(1, 30000, 3)
In [3]: c = numpy.arange(2, 30000, 3)
In [4]: def f(a, b, c):
   ...:     d = numpy.empty((len(a), 3), dtype=a.dtype)
   ...:     d[:, 0], d[:, 1], d[:, 2] = a, b, c
   ...:     return d.ravel()
   ...: 
In [5]: def g(a, b, c):
   ...:     return numpy.vstack((a, b, c)).T.ravel()
   ...: 
In [6]: %timeit f(a, b, c)
10000 loops, best of 3: 34.4 us per loop
In [7]: %timeit g(a, b, c)
10000 loops, best of 3: 177 us per loop
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Thanks a lot! it worked –  glethien Aug 6 '12 at 14:44
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You can use :

d = np.vstack((a, b, c)).T.ravel()

This saves one copy over .flatten() so it can be faster on large arrays.

EDIT: As stated by Sven Marnach this does not save a copy in this case.

vstack is faster than array for some reason :

In [1]: a = ones(1e4)

In [2]: b = ones(1e4)

In [3]: c = ones(1e4)

In [4]: %timeit np.vstack((a, b, c)).T.ravel()
1000 loops, best of 3: 265 us per loop

In [5]: %timeit np.vstack((a, b, c)).T.flatten()
1000 loops, best of 3: 268 us per loop

In [6]: %timeit np.array((a, b, c)).T.ravel()
100 loops, best of 3: 5.24 ms per loop

In [7]: def test(a, b, c):
    d = numpy.empty((len(a), 3), dtype=a.dtype)
    d.T[:] = a, b, c
    d = d.ravel()
    return d

In [8]: %timeit test(a, b, c)
100 loops, best of 3: 5.06 ms per loop

In [9]: def test2(a, b, c):
            d = np.empty((len(a), 3), dtype=a.dtype)
            d[:, 0], d[:, 1], d[:, 2] = a, b, c
            d = d.ravel()
            return d

In [9]: %timeit test2(a, b, c)
10000 loops, best of 3: 69.8 us per loop
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The use of ravel() does not save a copy in this case, since the data isn't layed out in the correct order in memory. There is no way of avoiding this copy after using vstack(). The code in the current answers (mine and yours) does two copies in total. This can be reduced to a single copy with a different trick – I'll add some code to my answer. –  Sven Marnach Aug 6 '12 at 15:27
    
I'm not sure why assigning to d.T[:] is that slow. Using d[:, 0], d[:, 1], d[:, 2] as assignment target instead speed the code up by a factor of 40 on my machine – I updated my answer again. :) –  Sven Marnach Aug 6 '12 at 15:50
    
You are absolutely right. Unfortunately, your new implementation is not any faster than the first vstack + flatten / ravel. –  Nicolas Barbey Aug 6 '12 at 16:01
    
Indeed, your last version rocks :) –  Nicolas Barbey Aug 6 '12 at 16:05
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