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While using string manipulation functions specificaly strcpy I did this small program.

char s1[8]="Hellopo";
char s2[4]="sup";
strcpy(s1,s2);
cout<<s1<<endl;

When I printed out s1 It actually just printed out "sup". I expected it to print "suplopo".

Then I did this:

cout<<s1+4 << endl;

It printed out "opo";

And The output of this: cout<<s1+3<<endl; was nothing

So after thinking a bit about it.

I came to this conclusion. Since C++ stops outputing the string once it reaches the null terminator. Therefore the null must have been copied in the strcpy function. Resulting in this string:

s - u - p - \0 - o - p - o -\0;

Please tell me if this is correct or not. And if im not please correct me.

And if you have any more info to provide please do.

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1  
Looks right to me. Your tests seem to bear that out. Though a debugger will show you what's in each byte of the char arrays. – Almo Aug 6 '12 at 15:14
3  
The strcpy() function copies the string pointed to by src, including the terminating null byte ('\0'), to the buffer pointed to by dest. The strings may not overlap, and the destination string dest must be large enough to receive the copy. linux.die.net/man/3/strcpy – FailedDev Aug 6 '12 at 15:14
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Your reasoning is correct, and would have easily been confirmed by any decent manual:

The strcpy() function copies the string pointed to by src, including the terminating null byte ('\0'), to the buffer pointed to by dest.

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You are correct. For the effect you initially expected, you would use strncopy. strcopy copies the null terminator as long as you specify the exact length of the string that is being copied.

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strncpy will also copy the null terminator, if there's space. For the expected effect, you'd want something like memcpy(s1, s2, strlen(s2)). – Mike Seymour Aug 6 '12 at 15:22
    
@MikeSeymour Good point. Edited to reflect that. – steveg89 Aug 6 '12 at 15:23
2  
strncpy(s1,s2,strlen(s2)) should also not copy the 0-terminator. – Daniel Fischer Aug 6 '12 at 15:25

This is correct.

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/strcpy.html

The strcpy() function shall copy the string pointed to by s2 (including the terminating null byte) into the array pointed to by s1.

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Yes, this is correct. strcpy will include the null terminator. It's important as if you copy the string to a new memory block you want it null terminated by default. I believe strncpy might be what you're after in this case.

Also I know it was only testing code but I'd be careful in this day and age of using +X offsets in strings... ascii normally bites people in the rear end in the utf8/unicode world we now live in.

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From the man page for strcpy:

The strcpy() function copies the string pointed to by src, including the terminating null byte ('\0'), to the buffer pointed to by dest. The strings may not overlap, and the destination string dest must be large enough to receive the copy.

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