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I am having a lot of confusion in trying to use either a lambda or functools.partial to create a new function with bound positional arguments from an existing function.

I want to do something like this (which is not behaving as desired):

def addFunction(self, name, in_function, secondary_args=None, secondary_kwargs=None):

        # Assign the function with optional args based on whether any
        # optional args are not None

        if secondary_args is not None and secondary_kwargs is not None:
            func = lambda x: in_function(x, *secondary_args, **secondary_kwargs)
        elif secondary_args is None and secondary_kwargs is not None:
            func = lambda x: in_function(x, **secondary_kwargs)
        elif secondary_args is not None and secondary_kwargs is None:
            func = lambda x: in_function(x, *secondary_args)
        else:
            func = in_function
        ###

        func.__doc__ = in_function.__doc__
        self[name] = func # <-- This method is a class method for something deriving dict.

I've also tried replacing all of the lambda statements with equivalent functools.partial statements.

The problem is that if I use this function like this:

# Assume some_function takes 3 arguments, a float, a Bool, and a String,
# in that order.

someObject.addFunction("my_f", some_function, secondary_args=[True, "Option_A"])

now when I try to use (just for example) someObject["my_f"](5.0) it reports the first argument is True when I debug it.

It seems like the bindings, either with lambda or with partial simply push in the positional arguments and either only accept your extra positional argument at the end of *args or else just are dropping it (I'm not sure which).

For my application, since lots of functions will be stored in a particular object like this, with varying numbers of optional arguments chosen by a user, it's important that the function I get back, with bound arguments, still accepts the user's argument as the first positional argument, without resorting to forcing all arguments to be key-word arguments.

This seems like it should be simple enough. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you use keyword arguments exclusively? –  phant0m Aug 6 '12 at 15:26
1  
Because the use case for this will be a bunch of folks writing scripts, where in each script they will write long lists of their own custom functions that they care about porting around with my object. I can't trust all of them to always make every function of theirs take keyword args only. –  EMS Aug 6 '12 at 15:27
    
Or always allow for *args and **kwargs. If they're not used, they're not used. –  jhoyla Aug 6 '12 at 15:27
    
Yes you can, if your function only accepts a dictionary, they have to abide by your rules. –  phant0m Aug 6 '12 at 15:28
1  
The folks using it are not Python programmers; I'm pretty sure they'll tell me to change that restriction immediately regardless of pragmatic benefits to doing it. –  EMS Aug 6 '12 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

Can you post a full script that reproduces the error? Because the following script works as expected:

class C(dict):                                                               
    def addFunction(self, name, in_function, secondary_args=None, secondary_kwargs=None):

        # Assign the function with optional args based on whether any        
        # optional args are not None                                         

        if secondary_args is not None and secondary_kwargs is not None:      
            func = lambda x, *secondary: in_function(x, *secondary_args, **secondary_kwargs)
        elif secondary_args is None and secondary_kwargs is not None:        
            func = lambda x: in_function(x, **secondary_kwargs)              
        elif secondary_args is not None and secondary_kwargs is None:        
            func = lambda x: in_function(x, *secondary_args)                 
        else:                                                                
            func = in_function                                               
        ###                                                                  

        func.__doc__ = in_function.__doc__                                   
        self[name] = func  # <-- This method is a class method for something deriving dict.


def f(x, y=0, z=1):                                                          
    print x, y, z                                                            


c = C()                                                                      
c.addFunction('my_f', f, secondary_args=[-1])                                
c['my_f'](0)                                                                 

# output is 0 -1 1, as expected                                              

Maybe the problem is in how you "attach" the function to your object?

share|improve this answer

Sounds like you just want some custom type of function wrapper:

class Caller(object):

    def __init__(self, fn, *args, **kwargs):
        self._fn = fn
        self._args = args 
        self._kwargs = kwargs

    def __call__(self, *uargs, **ukwargs):
        arg = uargs + self._args
        kw =  dict(ukwargs.items() + self._kwargs.items())
        self._fn(*arg, **kw)

And then to wrap something:

def test(a,b,c=None):
    print a,b,c

c = Caller(test, 2,c=True)
c(1)
# 1 2 True

I am sure that Caller could be cleaned up, but this was just a quick example of how to store the original fn and params, then have control over when it is being called.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not really what I am looking for. The users of my code are going to create scripts that contain functions used to sort on data objects. The data object should always be their first argument, but beyond that they will write functions however they want. I don't want to parse their arguments and wrap the function, instead I want to expose the ability for them to add their function into a dictionary-type object, and when they add it, they just have to supply a list/dictionary of the additional arguments, beyond the known common data argument. Then I want to bind their function onto those –  EMS Aug 6 '12 at 15:54
    
That way it's easy for them to script their functions. In your example, I'd have to add assumptions to the Caller class to always treat the first argument as data (I would just get rid of the overwritten call function, that's not what I need). But this should be achievable with lambda or partial to avoid needing the extra class definition. –  EMS Aug 6 '12 at 15:55
    
I would have thought you could make this work for your solution but I obviously, along with everyone else, am missing the point. There is no "parsing". You just split it how you want in the init and combine how tou want in the call. Pretty generic. –  jdi Aug 6 '12 at 16:00

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