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I am trying to build a simple component to understand how and why JSF 2.X works the way it does. I have been using the newer annotations and have been trying to piece together a clear example.

So I have built my component and deployed it in a xhtml file as follows:

<kal:day value="K.Day" title="Kalendar" model="#{kalendarDay}"/>

The within the UIComponent I do the following:

ValueExpression ve      = getValueExpression("model");
if (ve != null) 
{
    System.out.println("model expression "+ve.getExpressionString());
    model = (KalendarDay) ve.getValue(getFacesContext().getELContext());
    System.out.println("model "+model);
}

The expression "#{kalendarDay}" is correctly displayed indicating that the value has been successfully transmitted between the page and the component. However the evaluation of the expression results in "null".

This seems to indicate that the backing bean is unavailable at this point, although the page correctly validates and deploys. So I am 95% certain that the bean is there at run time.

So perhaps this is a phase thing? Should I be evaluating this in the decode of the renderer and setting the value in the attributes map? I am still a little confused about the combination of actual values and value expressions.

So my question is where should I fetch and evaluate the valueExpression for model and should I store the result of the evaluation in the UIComponent or should I simply evaluate it every time?

SSCCE files below I think these are the only required files to demonstrate the problem

Bean Interface -----

/**
 * 
 */
package com.istana.kalendar.fixture;

import java.util.Date;

/**
 * @author User
 *
 */
public interface KalendarDay
{
    public      Date        getDate();
}

Bean Implementation ---

/**
 * 
 */
package com.istana.kalendar.session.wui;

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;

import javax.ejb.Stateful;
import javax.inject.Named;

import com.istana.kalendar.fixture.KalendarDay;

/**
 * @author User
 *
 */
@Named      ("kalendarDay")
@Stateful
public class KalKalendarDay
    implements KalendarDay
{

    private     Calendar        m_date  =   Calendar.getInstance();

    /* (non-Javadoc)
     * @see com.istana.kalendar.fixture.KalendarDay#getDate()
     */
    @Override
    public      Date            getDate()
    {
        return m_date.getTime();
    }

}

UIComponent ---

/**
 * 
 */
package com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf;

import javax.el.ValueExpression;
import javax.faces.component.FacesComponent;
import javax.faces.component.UIOutput;

import com.istana.kalendar.fixture.KalendarDay;

/**
 * @author User
 *
 */
@FacesComponent     (value=UIDay.COMPONENT_TYPE)
public class UIDay  extends UIOutput
{
    static      final
    public      String          COMPONENT_TYPE      =   "com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf.Day";

    static      final
    public      String          COMPONENT_FAMILY    =   "com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf.Day";

    private     KalendarDay     m_model;

    private     String          m_title;

    @Override
    public      String          getRendererType() 
    {
        return UIDayRenderer.RENDERER_TYPE;
    }

    @Override
    public      String          getFamily() 
    {
        return COMPONENT_FAMILY;
    }

    public      KalendarDay     getModel()
    {
        KalendarDay     model = (KalendarDay) getStateHelper().eval("model");

        System.out.println("model "+model);

        return model;
    }

    public      void            setModel(KalendarDay model)
    {
        getStateHelper().put("model",model);
    }

    public      String          getTitle()
    {
        return (String) getStateHelper().eval("title");
    }

    public      void            setTitle(String title)
    {
        getStateHelper().put("title",title);
    }
}

UIComponentRenderer ---

/**
 * 
 */
package com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf;

import java.io.IOException;

import javax.el.ValueExpression;
import javax.faces.component.UIComponent;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.faces.context.ResponseWriter;
import javax.faces.render.FacesRenderer;
import javax.faces.render.Renderer;

import com.istana.kalendar.fixture.KalendarDay;

/**
 * @author User
 *
 */
@FacesRenderer  (componentFamily    = UIDay.COMPONENT_FAMILY
                ,rendererType       = UIDayRenderer.RENDERER_TYPE
                )
public class UIDayRenderer extends Renderer
{
    static      final
    public      String      RENDERER_TYPE   =   "com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf.DayRenderer";

    @Override
    public      void        encodeBegin (FacesContext context,UIComponent component) 
        throws IOException 
    {
        UIDay uic = (UIDay) component;

        ResponseWriter writer = context.getResponseWriter();
        writer.startElement("p", uic);
        /*
         * This is the call that triggers the println
         */
        writer.write("Day - "+uic.getModel().getDate());
    }

    @Override
    public      void        encodeEnd   (FacesContext context,UIComponent component) 
            throws IOException 
    {
        ResponseWriter writer = context.getResponseWriter();
        writer.endElement("p");
        writer.flush();
    }
}

kalendar.taglib.xml ---

<facelet-taglib 
    id="kalendar"
    xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-facelettaglibrary_2_0.xsd"
    version="2.0"
>

    <namespace>http://istana.com/kalendar</namespace>
    <tag>
        <tag-name>day</tag-name>
        <component>
            <component-type>com.istana.kalendar.fixture.jsf.Day</component-type>
        </component>
    </tag>

</facelet-taglib>
share|improve this question
    
To exclude the one and other, is #{kalendarDay} specified by var of an iterating UI component like <h:dataTable> or so? Where exactly in the custom component's code are you trying to access it? It sounds like as if it's indeed inside an iterating UI component and you're trying to access it during the view build time in component's constructor or so. – BalusC Aug 6 '12 at 15:39
    
This is no inside any iteration is is standalone. The backing bean is as follows: – Jeff Lowcock Aug 6 '12 at 15:54

I'm not sure why it's null, but the symptoms indicate that the #{kalendarDay} is been specified during view render time while you're trying to evaluate it during the view build time.


So perhaps this is a phase thing? Should I be evaluating this in the decode of the renderer and setting the value in the attributes map? I am still a little confused about the combination of actual values and value expressions.

You should use the encodeXxx() methods of the component or the associated renderer (if any) to generate HTML based on the component's attributes/properties.

You should use the decode() method of the component or the associated renderer (if any) to set component's attributes/properties based on HTTP request parameters which are been sent along with a HTML form submit.


So my question is where should I fetch and evaluate the valueExpression for model and should I store the result of the evaluation in the UIComponent or should I simply evaluate it every time?

Since JSF 2.x it's recommended to explicitly specify a getter and setter for component attributes which in turn delegates to UIComponent#getStateHelper().

public String getValue() {
    return (String) getStateHelper().eval("value");
}

public void setValue(String value) {
    getStateHelper().put("value", value);
}

public String getTitle() {
    return (String) getStateHelper().eval("title");
}

public void setTitle(String title) {
    getStateHelper().put("title", title);
}

public Object getModel() {
    return getStateHelper().eval("model");
}

public void setModel(Object model) {
    getStateHelper().put("model", model);
}

That's all you basically need (note that the getter and setter must exactly match the attribute name as per Javabeans specification). Then in the encodeXxx() method(s) just call getModel() to get (and evaluate) the value of the model attribute.

share|improve this answer
    
I have made thos changes and have as an example KalendarDay model = (KalendarDay) getStateHelper().eval("model"); System.out.println("model "+model); return model; and the result is still "null" (sorry about the formatting). (I think your explaination of encode/decode indicates that I should look elsewhere for the solution). Should I be explicitly setting the values such as setModel from somewhere or does this happen automatically? – Jeff Lowcock Aug 6 '12 at 16:08
    
You have still not clarified where exactly you're trying to access the attributes. First of all, are you accessing them in encodeXxx() or decode() method of the component and/or the associated renderer? If not, then you're simply accessing it at the wrong moment. As to explicitly setting the values, no you don't need to do, JSF does this transparently. – BalusC Aug 6 '12 at 16:16
    
Ok sorry about that. The methods you have indicated I have implemented these on the UIComponent. I think this is correct if I have understood what you have said. The small piece of code in my previous comment is my implementation of the getModel() method. I call this getModel() method in the encodeBegin(context,component) method of the UIComponentRenderer. This invocation triggers the println resulting in the "null" so once again the evaluation results in a null. – Jeff Lowcock Aug 6 '12 at 16:28
    
Sounds okay. I don't see in the information provided so far why it would be null. Any chance if you could prepare an SSCCE and include it in your question? – BalusC Aug 6 '12 at 16:39
    
The only other thought I have is because I am using annotations I have not defined the <attribute> tags in the taglib.xml file. So perhaps I need to do this to enable JSF to understand the existence, required, and class type characteristics of the custom tag attributes? – Jeff Lowcock Aug 6 '12 at 16:41

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