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I am learning about access levels in java and I have created 3 classes: In package my.inheritance I have class A and class C

package my.inheritance;
public class A {
protected int a=15; 
}

package my.inheritance;
public class C {

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    A a = new A();
    System.out.println(a.a);
}
}

And in another package called my.inheritance.test I have a class B trying to access protected field of int value a but the compiler complains for this!

package my.inheritance.test;
import my.inheritance.A;
public class B extends A{

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    A a = new A();
    int value = a.a;
    System.out.println(value);
}
}

I was under the impression with protected you can access a member from a different class in a different package as long as you subclass it! Why the visibility error then ?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Every method can access protected fields of its own class, and all its parent classes. This does not include access to protected fields of another class, even if they have the corresponding base class in common.

So methods in class B can access protected fields from objects of class B, even if they were declared in A, but not from some other object of class A.

One could say that class B inherits the protected members from A, so now every B has those members as well. It doesn't inherit access to the protected members of A itself, so it cannot operate on protected members of any A but only on those of B, even if they were inherited from A.

share|improve this answer
    
Not entirely correct - change 'object' to 'class' in the first sentence. Access is applied at the class level, not the object level - objects of the same class can even access each other's private members. (This trick can be used to good effect inside "equals()" methods.) – Nate Aug 6 '12 at 16:01
    
@Nate: then why doesn't the OP's code work? – Louis Wasserman Aug 6 '12 at 16:02
    
@Nate, I'm a bit confused about the timeline here: I saw your comment, edited my answer to take that into account, wrote a reply comment, saw your comment vanish, removed my reply comment. Is it the same comment I see now, or a new one? As I no longer have “object” in my first sentence, I assume it's correct now. In any case thanks for pointing this out. – MvG Aug 6 '12 at 16:09
    
@LouisWasserman, the OP tries to access code from A, but has access only to protected members from B. One could say that class B inherits protected members from A, so now every B has those members. It doesn't inherit access to the protected members of A itself. Is that formulation any clearer? – MvG Aug 6 '12 at 16:10
    
I don't think I'm fully satisfied by it, no. Every B has those members whether their access is protected or private, it's just a question of whether or not B can see those members...and the OP's code seems to demonstrate while non-static methods in B can access A.a (for any instance of A!). static methods cannot. "Access is applied at the class level" misses the point that some methods (the static ones) apparently can't access these fields, but some methods (the instance ones) cannot. – Louis Wasserman Aug 6 '12 at 16:18

Try:

public class B extends A
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        B a = new B();
        int value = a.a;
        System.out.println(value);
    }
}

You can access a only if it is in the same object.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh I c. It is because I'm trying to access it from main via A and only class B has access to this field. – Phoenix Aug 6 '12 at 15:47

1. protected is an access modifier which is used when you want to have an access outside the package.

2. Most people try to access the protected member of the Super class by creating and Object reference variable of the Super class, and then using dot operator to access that protected member.... But thats WRONG.

3. We get access to the inherited member of the Super class Not the direct member of the super class.

Eg:

package com.demo1;

public class A{

protected int a = 5;

}

package com.demo2;

public class B extends A{

public static void main(String[] args){

         System.out.println(new B().a);   // This "a" is the inherited member

  }

}

4. And one more important point, This inherited "a" member in the sub-class, will be seen by the another class in the same package that of the sub-class as a private member.. So consider that another class in this package can't even see this protected memeber...

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You have access to this field from B using this.a because B extends A, but in this case you are trying to access to this field througth an instance of A, this is limited by the protected access.

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What you're trying to do is:

A a = new A();
int value = a.a;

Note that a.a is a qualified name, and in this case you can call it in body of a class B only if the type of the expression to the left of . is B or it's subclass.

Relevant part of JLS

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