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I read Effective Java and there it's stated that Singleton is best implemented using Enum.

This approach is functionally equivalent to the public field approach, except that it is more concise, provides the serialization machinery for free, and provides an ironclad guarantee against multiple instantiation, even in the face of sophisticated serialization or reflection attacks. While this approach has yet to be widely adopted, a single-element enum type is the best way to implement a singleton.

Still, this seems like a trade-off to achieve on the fly serialization and true single instance, but you loose the more friendly oop approach of an classical singleton. Enum can't be inherited, can extend only an Interface and if you want to provide a skeleton class you need to create an helper class.

So, why should we accept Enum as the best implementation for Singleton, other than the reasons stated above?

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What kind of "skeleton class" are you talking about? I can't remember every subclassing another non-Object class in order to create a singleton - it almost always implements an interface. (I'm not saying it doesn't happen - I just can't remember doing it.) –  Jon Skeet Aug 6 '12 at 15:57
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The real question is, why do you require a singleton in the first place? And if you do require it, how would a singleton extend another class? Would that class also be a singleton? If not, how does that work? If it is, what happens if someone else extends it too? You'll have two instances of a singleton base class. –  biziclop Aug 6 '12 at 15:59
    
could be useful. stackoverflow.com/questions/4992893/… –  mmc18 Aug 6 '12 at 15:59
    
Singleton is a seriously deprecated anti-pattern, I think the only fair use for this is to implement constants, which enums do handily. –  djechlin Aug 6 '12 at 16:00
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@sa_vedem I guess he means any class apart from java.lang.Object. –  biziclop Aug 6 '12 at 16:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

this seems like a trade-off to achieve on the fly serialization

For me its a lot simpler and more concise to write something like

enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
}

If you have a need to write alot more code or introduce complexity then do so, but this is rarely required IMHO.

you loose the more friendly oop approach of an classical singleton.

I find using fields to be simpler.

Enum can't be inherited,

True, but having multiple singletons is suspect in itself. Enums can inherit from interfaces which allows you to swap one implementation for another.

If you want to provide a skeleton class you need to create an helper class

A helper class doesn't have any state. A skeleton class might have some state in which case you need delegation.

BTW: You can use enum for helper classes

enum Helper {;
    public static my_static_methods_here;
}

why should we accept Enum as the best implementation for Singleton

I would follow the YAGNI principle. Only develop what you need, not what you imagine you might need.

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Enum can't be inherited

And it's one of best parts of enum being singleton.

If you can inherit singleton, it's not a singleton any more.

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There was a similar discussion at stackoverflow a while ago: What is an efficient way to implement a singleton pattern in Java?

The accepted answer provides good links on that topic:

Joshua Bloch explained this approach in his Effective Java Reloaded talk at Google I/O 2008: link to video. Also see slides 30-32 of his presentation (effective_java_reloaded.pdf):

The main point is that it is quite hard to write a singleton that is a real singleton. Enum values are guaranteed to exist only once.

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