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I'm looking to have a hierarchical class structure in which a level of controller 'parent' classes are responsible for creating/directing a number of 'child' classes. The parent class should be able to reference each child it creates directly, and each child should be able to reference its parent (and, assuming this child is not also a parent of more classes, only its parent) directly. This allows for the referencing of siblings through the parent. I've found this paradigm to be useful in JIT compilation languages like Java and C#, but C++ presents a unique problem...

My first attempt to implement this paradigm was as follows:

Parent Class TreeRoot.h

#ifndef __CCPP_SCENE_H__
#define __CCPP_SCENE_H__
#include "ChildA.h"
#include "ChildB.h"

class TreeRoot : 
{
private:


ChildA* a;
ChildB* b;

public:

//member getters
ChildA* getA();
ChildB* getB();
};

#endif // __CCPP_SCENE_H__

Child class ChildA.h

#ifndef CHILDA_H_
#define CHILDA_H_


#include "TreeRoot.h"


class ChildA
{

private:
TreeRoot* rootScene;

public:
ChildA(TreeRoot*);
~ChildA(void);

TreeRoot* getRootScene();
void setRootScene(TreeRoot*);

};

#endif /*CHILDA_H_*/

Child class ChildB.h

#ifndef CHILDB_H_
#define CHILDB_H_


#include "TreeRoot.h"


class ChildB
{

private:
TreeRoot* rootScene;

public:
ChildB(TreeRoot*);
~ChildB(void);

TreeRoot* getRootScene();
void setRootScene(TreeRoot*);

};

#endif /*CHILDB_H_*/

Now of course that wouldn't compile because of the circular include (TreeRoot.h includes ChildA.h and ChildB.h, which both include TreeRoot.h etc) So I tried using forward declaration instead:

Parent Class TreeRoot.h

#ifndef __CCPP_SCENE_H__
#define __CCPP_SCENE_H__
#include "ChildA.h"
#include "ChildB.h"

class TreeRoot : 
{
private:


ChildA* a;
ChildB* b;

public:

//member getters
ChildA* getA();
ChildB* getB();
};

#endif // __CCPP_SCENE_H__

Child class ChildA.h

#ifndef CHILDA_H_
#define CHILDA_H_


//#include "TreeRoot.h" //can't use; circular include!
class TreeRoot;

class ChildA
{

private:
TreeRoot* rootScene;

public:
ChildA(TreeRoot*);
~ChildA(void);

TreeRoot* getRootScene();
void setRootScene(TreeRoot*);

};

#endif /*CHILDA_H_*/

Child class ChildB.h

#ifndef CHILDB_H_
#define CHILDB_H_


//#include "TreeRoot.h" //can't use; circular include!
class TreeRoot;



class ChildB
{

private:
TreeRoot* rootScene;

public:
ChildB(TreeRoot*);
~ChildB(void);

TreeRoot* getRootScene();
void setRootScene(TreeRoot*);

};

#endif /*CHILDB_H_*/

that implementation almost works in that I can successfully broadcast messages to the child objects and perform callbacks from the child objects to the parent class as follows:

TreeRoot.cpp

...
a->someChildMethod();
a->getRootScene()->someParentMethod();

However when I try the following:

ChildA.cpp

...
rootScene->someParentMethod(); //ERROR C2027: use of undefined type TreeRoot

I get an undefined type error. This makes sense since using forward declaration as above doesn't inform the compiler of what TreeRoot actually is. The question then is how can I enable calls from the child objects like the rootScene->someParentMethod() call above? Perhaps some use of generic types via templates would make the compiler happy and provide the functionality I'm looking for?

thanks, CCJ

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1  
Well with all do respect but this "paradigm" is not a recommended approach. You are creating cycles in your dependency graph, which is a no no. Your child objects need not now about the parent. If a call back is necessary, I will suggest to add an interface, independent of father and child, implemented by the father, adn then used by the children. –  Alex Vaz Aug 6 '12 at 16:29
2  
@Alex: Just as doubly-linked lists have their uses, so do trees where the child nodes know their parents. –  JAB Aug 6 '12 at 16:37
    
@Alex what alternative design paradigm would you suggest that would provide equivalent functionality (e.g. assume the child nodes do need to know their parent)? How would you implement the interface you suggested? –  CCJ Aug 6 '12 at 16:58
    
This is probably a good case for an exception but: 1) With hierarchical/acyclic design there is a clear order of construction / destruction, which avoids awful null pointer errors. 2) The worst problem in my view is that of control. In a hierarchical, as you build your classes, you depend on the classes you have the design control of, the ones below you in hierarchy or abstraction. If you break this and depend on an upper level class, then changes in these classes will break your code. See: www10.informatik.uni-erlangen.de/Teaching/Courses/SS2012/CPP/… –  Alex Vaz Aug 6 '12 at 18:30
1  
Going by slide #5, I'm assuming the person who wrote that has never heard of the concept of "mocking" and its use in unit testing. Though as an aside, going with the all-nodes-use-one-(super)class method would make the issues being talked about there kind of moot, as there wouldn't be those cyclic class dependencies. –  JAB Aug 6 '12 at 20:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a forward declaration in all your .h files. You can do this since you're only storing pointers as class members so you don't need the full class declaration.

Then, in all your corresponding .cpp files, #include the header files for the classes you need.

So, in TreeRoot.h you forward declare ChildA and ChildB. In TreeRoot.cpp, you #include ChildA.h and ChildB.h.

Rinse and repeat for your 2 other classes.

Take note that this will solve your current problem, but this design seems flaky at best.

share|improve this answer
    
well that does do the trick, but having to include the headers of sibling nodes in each child class's implementation approaches defeating the point... what alternative paradigm would you suggest? –  CCJ Aug 6 '12 at 17:15
1  
@CCJ I would suggest making only one class (Node) and have this class contain a pointer to its parent Node and a vector of pointers to child nodes. This is usually how trees are represented. It all comes down to the fact that every node in a tree can be seen as a tree root itself. –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 6 '12 at 17:17
    
that sounds like a solid plan. How would I declare the parent pointer and children pointers vector as generic types? I'm thinking it might be useful to make Node a class that each tree-structured object could inherit from, and would have members something like this (though this is evidently not correct syntax) ... template <typename T>* parent_ptr; vector<template <typename T>>* children_ptr; –  CCJ Aug 7 '12 at 15:46
    
@CCJ The inherent strength in the single class is that even though you have node subclasses, they can be treated as nodes and nothing else. I would declare my classes something along the lines of: pastebin.com/TCuXDpLs. You don't want your nodes to know the specific type of their parent or children, that's the strength of OO design and polymorphism. –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 7 '12 at 16:33

You could try including the 'TreeRoot.h' in the ChildA and ChildB files. I would also suggest using Polymorphism and create a parent class, which A and B inherit from, for shared behaviour.

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This doesn't involve fiddling with the header files, but my suggestion: Either make all your nodes the same class (enables more flexibility [what if you decide you want to make a tree into a subtree of another tree? you'd have to change the class of the root node from the first tree into the child class], and, at least in my mind, makes more sense/seems more elegant/would lessen the amount of and/or simplify the code you'd have to write), or use a superclass for both parent and child node classes (as ATaylor suggests), though I feel that would only be a better solution if your parent and child nodes have a lot of differing functionality beyond that which they would require to form the tree structure.

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In ChildA.cpp file you have to include the parent header as

#include "TreeRoot.h"
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