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I need to iterate on two lists in the following way:

Pseudo code:

j=1
for i=1 to n:
   print a[i], b[j]
   while b[j+1] <= a[i]:
      j++
      print a[i], b[j]

For example:

a = [1 3 5 7]
b = [2 4 9] 

Desired output:

1 2
3 2
5 2
5 4
7 4

How do you do it cleanly in python?

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3  
The question seems incomplete to me, can you explain your output based on the two input lists? What happened to the 9? –  Levon Aug 6 '12 at 17:13
    
@Levon the 9 doesn't show up in the output of the pseudocode, as my translated Python shows. –  murgatroid99 Aug 6 '12 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your pseudo code will almost work in Python. Some working code that does what you want is:

a = [1, 3, 5, 7]
b = [2, 4, 9] 
j = 0
for i in range(len(a)):
    print a[i], b[j]
    while j<len(b)-1 and b[j+1] <= a[i]:
        j += 1
        print a[i], b[j]

Note the few changes to make it work in Python:

  1. When declaring the list, commas are required between items.
  2. List indices start at 0, so both i and j should start there.
  3. len(a) returns the length of a (4 in this case), and iterating i through range(len(a)) executes the loop for each integer from 0 to len(a)-1, which is all of the indices in a.
  4. The ++ operation is not supported in Python, so we use j +=1 instead.
  5. We have to avoid using out of bounds indices of b, so we test to make sure j will be in bounds before incrementing it.

This code can be made more pythonic by iterating through the list as follows:

a = [1, 3, 5, 7]
b = [2, 4, 9] 
j = 0
for element in a:
   print element, b[j]
   while j<len(b)-1 and b[j+1] <= element:
      j += 1
      print element, b[j]

In general, you probably don't want to just print list elements, so for a more general use case you can create a generator, like:

def sync_lists(a, b)
    if b:
        j = 0
        for element in a:
            yield (element, b[j])
            while j<len(b)-1 and b[j+1] <= element:
                j += 1
                yield (element, b[j])

And then you can print them as before with

a = [1, 3, 5, 7]
b = [2, 4, 9]
for (e1, e2) in sync_lists(a, b):
    print e1, e2
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this seems just unusual enough that a direct translation of the pseudocode is probably simpler than some games with next and itertools. I might wrap up this iteration logic in a generator, though, which seems to me the most Pythonic "home" for quirky iteration logics. –  DSM Aug 6 '12 at 17:25
    
@DSM that's a good point, I'll add an iterator version. –  murgatroid99 Aug 6 '12 at 17:26
    
I'm curious -- you recommend using enumerate, but it doesn't look like you're using i. Wouldn't it be easier just to iterate over the list? –  Sam Mussmann Aug 6 '12 at 17:35
    
@SamMussmann you're right, I missed that. For some reason I thought I still needed the index into a. –  murgatroid99 Aug 6 '12 at 17:36
    
if b is empty your code produces IndexError –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 7 '12 at 13:25

The generator code in murgatroid99's answer can be generalised to any iterables (as opposed to sequences only) by using next() instead of index arithmetic:

def sync_list(a, b):
    b = iter(b)
    y, next_y = next(b), next(b)
    for x in a:
       yield x, y
       while next_y <= x:
          y, next_y = next_y, next(b)
          yield x, y
share|improve this answer
    
Note that with the wrong arrays, you might start getting StopIteration exceptions. I modified my code to avoid the corresponding IndexErrors. –  murgatroid99 Aug 7 '12 at 13:09
1  
@murgatroid99: StopIteration is handled by a caller e.g., a for-loop. No special handling is required in the generator for "wrong" arrays. –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 7 '12 at 13:24
    
@J.F.Sebastian but b is not being iterated through in a for-loop, so the caller is sync_list. Calling next can raise that exception, and using it in a loop doesn't magically handle it. –  murgatroid99 Aug 7 '12 at 13:26
    
@murgatroid99: If StopIteration is raised inside a generator, this terminates the generator. I think this is the more reasonable behaviour than breaking the invariants (which is what your new code does in case b is too short). –  Sven Marnach Aug 7 '12 at 13:28
    
@murgatroid99: The example caller is for e1, e2 in sync_lists(a, b):. It handles StopIteration transparently –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 7 '12 at 13:29

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